Amazon Kindle Leads Computers and Tablets in Customer Experience

We recently released the 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings that ranks the customer experience of 293 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Amazon (Kindle) and Apple deliver the best customer experience in the computer and tablet industry, according to the 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings, an annual ranking of companies based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Amazon took the top spot with a rating of 76%, placing it 41st overall out of 293 companies. Apple came in second with a rating of 68% and an overall ranking of 119th.

While the Temkin Experience Ratings have included computer makers for five years, it added tablets to this category in 2015. Amazon’s Kindle—a newcomer to the Ratings—unseated Apple as the highest-scoring computer and tablet maker, a position Apple had held for the previous three years.

At the other end of the spectrum, Lenovo and Asus tied for the lowest-rated computer and tablet maker, each with a rating of 55% and an overall ranking of 245th. Lenovo dropped six percentage-points from 2014, while this is the first year that Asus has been included in the Ratings.

Overall, the computer & tablet industry averaged a 63% rating in the 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings and tied for 11th place out of 20 industries. It was also one of only 5 industries to improve its rating over the past year, increasing its average by 1.2 percentage points.

Here are some additional findings:

  • The ratings of all computer makers in the 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings are as follows: Amazon (76%), Apple (68%), Hewlett-Packard (64%), Barnes & Noble (60%), Toshiba (60%), Sony (60%), Acer (57%), Dell (57%), Lenovo (55%), and Asus (55%).
  • Sony (+5 points) and Apple (+1 point) were the only companies in this industry to improve their ratings between 2014 and 2015.
  • Lenovo (-6 points), Acer (-4 points), and Dell (-2 points) declined by the most percentage-points between 2014 and 2015.

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Apple and Google Lead Software Industry in Customer Experience

We recently released the 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings that ranks the customer experience of 293 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Here are some highlights from the Ratings for software firms:

  • Apple and Google tied for the highest score in the software industry, each scoring 66% and ranking 136th overall. Apple’s score declined by two percentage-points from last year, while Google’s increased by one point.
  • Blackboard dropped seven points between 2014 and 2015—from 54% last year to 47% this year—making it the lowest ranked software company for the second year in a row. It was also the only software company to score a “very poor” rating.
  • Blackboard received the lowest TxR component ratings in all three categories, falling more than 10 percentage-points below the industry average in each one. It fell 10.2 points below industry average in success, 14.5 points below industry average in effort, and 14.1 points below industry average in emotion.
  • The average rating for software firms dropped 2.4 percentage-points in the last year, down from 63% in 2014 to 60% in 2015.
  • In addition to the overall rating, the average score of each component decreased between 2014 and 2015. In 2014 the industry average for success was 68%, now it is 66%. Likewise, the average score for effort dropped from 65% to 63%, and the average score for emotion dropped from 55% to 53%.
  • Apple earned the highest score for both the success and emotion components, scoring 72% and 60% respectively. Google, meanwhile, scored the highest for the effort component with 70%.
  • Google and Intuit were the only two software firms to have increased their score over the past year; however, each only improved by one percentage-point. Google went from 65% to 66% over the past year, and Intuit went from 63% to 64%.
  • Although Activision fell below the industry average for both the success and effort component, it scored 2.4 percentage-points higher than the industry average for the emotion component. Sony, on the other hand, scored above industry average for both effort and emotion, but scored 2.9 percentage-points below average for the success component.

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Like Digital Cameras? Thank Sony’s Organizational Empathy

I read an interesting article by Sony’s former VP of Brand and Strategy in Fast Company called How Sony Learned That Product Features Don’t Matter. The article discuses how Sony adjusted its digital camera design based on a rich understanding of how consumers were interacting with them. Here are some excerpts from the article:

People would snap informal pictures in the middle of the action and share them with people right on the spot using the instant display on the back of the camera. Picture-taking and picture-sharing added to the fun and action of the occasion in the moment. They wouldn’t be the best quality pictures–oftentimes people would take several pictures of the same shot–but now that they were “free” and disposable, getting the perfect picture was no longer as important. Sometimes images would then be saved, printed, and displayed, but many would remain in the camera forgotten after the moment passed.

This kind of behavior had not been anticipated by our product designers. They had assumed, as most of us had, that digital cameras represented a new, more convenient method of gratifying old, reliable emotional needs–to preserve memories of special occasions by putting images in photo albums and hanging them on walls. Many of our efforts had been focused on helping people take high-quality pictures and on transferring image files from camera to computer for printing and storage.

All the improvements you saw in Sony’s digital cameras during the decade of the 2000s–larger, brighter instant displays, easy gallery-style browsing, wireless instant sharing options, and ever smaller camera sizes–were spurred by these kinds of empathic insights into how people felt about cameras and about photographs.

My take: Sony was able to evolve its digital cameras based on the company’s ability to master the three characteristics of organizational empathy: Perceive-Reflect-Adjust.

  • Perceive: Customers used their new digital phones in a different way than Sony originally anticipated.
  • Reflect: Sony sent employees to go watch customers as they used their phones to discover what they actually wanted from the device. They discovered that users actually wanted to look at the pictures immediately and often took many, lower-quality pictures of the same picture.
  • Adjust: Sony made larger, brighter instant displays, easy gallery-style browsing, wireless instant sharing option, and smaller camera sizes to fit this customer need.

The bottom line: Find ways to Amplify Empathy in your organization!

Apple Leads Computer Industry in 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings

We recently released the 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings that ranks the customer experience of 268 companies across 19 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Apple took the top spot with a rating of 67%, placing it 119th overall out of 268 companies across 19 industries, while Hewlett-Packard came in a close second with a rating of 64% and an overall ranking of 144th. This is Apple’s fourth straight year as the highest-rated computer maker, and Hewlett-Packard maintained its second-place position from last year. At the other end of the spectrum, Sony and Compaq tied for the lowest-rated computer maker, each with a rating of 55% and overall ranking of 232nd. While Sony was also on the bottom in 2013, this is the lowest ranking that Compaq has ever received.

Download entire dataset for $395

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Here are some additional findings from the airline industry: Read more of this post

Symantec and Apple Lead Software Industry in 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings

We recently released the 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings that ranks the customer experience of 268 companies across 19 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Symantec took the top spot for the first time ever, earning a 69% rating and landing in 102nd place overall out of 268 companies across 19 industries. Apple came in a very close second with a rating of 68% and an overall rank of 109th. While Symantec ascended from its 2013 position in the middle of the group, Apple maintained its second-place rank from last year. Meanwhile, at the bottom of the list, Blackboard’s ranking dropped dramatically, leaving it in last place with a rating of 54% and an overall ranking of 241st.

Download entire dataset for $395

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Here are some additional findings from the software industry: Read more of this post

Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2014

1402_WhatHappensAfterGoodBadExperiences_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2014. The report, which includes 19 data charts, examines which companies and industries provide the most bad experiences, what impact those experiences have on spending, and how the negative impacts of bad experiences can be mitigated by good service recovery. The report also examines how consumers share their good and bad experiences with companies as well as with other people. Here’s the executive summary:

To understand the effect of good and bad experiences, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with 268 companies across 19 industries. Results show that Internet services and TV services are the industries most likely to deliver a bad experience to their customers, while grocery chains are the least likely to. At the company level, Scottrade had the smallest percentage of customers reporting a recent bad experience with the company and Time Warner Cable had the highest. More than half of the customers who encountered a bad experience at a fast food chain, credit card issuer, grocery store, or hotel either decreased their spending with the company or stopped altogether. However, our data shows that a good service recovery effort can help mitigate a bad experience. Unfortunately, many firms—especially in the banking, Internet services, and TV services sectors—aren’t very good at service recovery. In addition to the consequences of bad interactions, we also examined which channels customers use to share their good and bad experiences and how these changed across age groups. We then compared these results to survey responses from the past two years. We also uncovered a negative bias inherent in how customers provide feedback. ING Direct, Residence Inn, and Fairfield Inn have the most negative bias in the feedback they receive directly from customers, while Hy-Vee and Hyundai have the most negative bias on Facebook. 

Click link to see full list of industries and companies covered in this report (.pdf).

Download report for $195
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One of the most interesting analyses in the report is the look at how service recovery after a bad experience affects the spending pattern of consumers. Here’s a summary of one of the charts showing just how important it is for a company to recover well after making a mistake:

1402_EconomicsOfServiceRecovery

Here are some other insights from the research:

  • Sixteen percent of consumers who have interacted with TV service and Internet service providers report having a bad experience over the previous six months. Next on the list are wireless carriers, with 12% of their customers reporting a bad experience. At the other end of the spectrum, only 3% of consumers report a bad experience with grocery chains and 4% report having a bad experience with fast food chains.
  • The five companies with the most customers reporting bad experiences are Time Warner Cable (25%), Motel 6 (22%), Coventry Health Care (21%), and Comcast (21%). There were 10 companies with only 1% or less of their customers reporting bad experiences: Scottrade, Chick-fil-A, H.E.B., Whole Foods, ShopRite, ING Direct, Starbucks, Trader Joe’s, Vanguard, and True Value.
  • More than one-quarter of consumers who have a bad experience stop spending with computer makers, car rental agencies, credit card issuers, hotel chains, and software companies. The impact of bad experiences is less costly for parcel delivery services, wireless carriers, health plans, TV service providers, Internet service providers, and grocery chains, as less than 15% of their customers with bad experience stopped spending.
  • The industries that are the best at responding to a bad experience are investment firms, major appliances, retailers, and car rental agencies. The industries that are the worst at responding to a bad experience are TV service providers, wireless carriers, Internet service providers, parcel delivery services, and health plans.
  • Thirty-two percent of consumers give feedback directly to companies after a very bad experience and 23% give feedback after a very good experience.
  • Overall, 25- to 34-year-olds are the most likely to share feedback about their experiences. After a good experience 57% tell a friend directly, 28% share on Facebook, and 18% put a comment or rating on a review site. After a bad experience, 60% tell a friend directly, 31% share on Facebook, and 20% write a review.

Download report for $195
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The bottom line: Make sure to recover quickly after a bad experience

USAA On Top of 2013 Temkin Customer Service Ratings

We just released the third annual Temkin Customer Service Ratings of 235 companies across 19 industries based on a study of 10,000 U.S. consumers (see full list of firms).

Download entire dataset for $295

Company Results

Here are some company highlights:

2103TCSR_TopBottomFirms2103TCSR_IndustryLeadersLaggards

  • USAA earned the top two spots for its insurance and banking businesses. Other companies at the top of the ratings are credit unionsAce HardwareCharles SchwabDollar TreeChick-fil-ASonic Drive-InHy-VeeCostcoTrader Joe’s, Advantage, Publix, and H.E.B.
  • TV service providers and Internet service providers earned nine out of bottom 10 spots in the ratings.
  • For the second straight year, Charter Communications took the bottom spot. The rest of the firms in the bottom five are Time Warner CableCox CommunicationsOptimum (i/o), and CareFirst.
  • The following companies earned ratings that were 15 or more points above their industry averages: USAA (insurance and banking), Alaska Airlines, credit unions, Advantage, Kaiser Permanente, TriCare, Charles Schwab, and Bright House Networks.
  • Five companies earned ratings that were 15 or more points below their industry averages: Apple Stores, US AirwaysRadioShack, HSBC, and 21st Century.
  • Twenty-three percent of companies earned “strong” or “very strong” ratings, while 37% earned “weak” or “very weak” ratings.

Temkin Group also examined year-over-year results for the 171 companies that were in both the 2012 and 2013 Temkin Customer Service Ratings and found that:

  • Forty-four percent of companies improved their ratings while 47% experienced a decline.
  • Twenty companies showed double-digit increases, led by: Citibank (banking and credit cards), U.S. Bank, Hyundai, Nissan, Old Navy, Charles Schwab, Continental Airlines, and Piggly-Wiggly.
  • Eleven companies showed double-digit decreases, led by: LG, Giant Eagle, Toshiba, Cox Communications, ING Direct, and Budget.

Industry Results

Here are some industry highlights:

2103TCSR_Industries

  • Grocery chains, retailers, and fast food chains earned the highest average Temkin Customer Service Ratings, while TV service providers, Internet service providers, wireless carriers, and health plans earned the lowest ratings.
  • On average, credit card issuers, banks and fast food restaurants improved the most while appliance makers, TV service providers and investment firms declined the most.

Calculating the Temkin Customer Service Ratings

During January 2013, Temkin Group asked 10,000 U.S. consumers to identify the companies that they had interacted with on their websites during the previous 60 days. These consumers were asked the following question:

Thinking back to your most recent customer service interaction with these companies,
how satisfied were you with the experience?

Responses from 1= “very dissatisfied” to 7= “very satisfied”

For all companies with 100 or more consumer responses, we calculated the “net satisfaction” score. The Temkin Customer Service  Ratings are calculated by taking the percentage of consumers that selected either “6” or “7” and subtracting the percentage of consumers that selected either “1,” “2,” or “3.”

Download entire dataset for $295

Temkin Ratings website

To see all of the companies in the Temkin Customer Service Ratings as ell as all of our other Temkin Ratings and sort through the results, visit the Temkin Ratings website

The bottom line: TV service providers deliver terrible customer service

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