Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2013

1311_NPSBenchmarkStudy_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2013. This study of 10,000 U.S. consumers benchmarks Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) for 269 companies across 19 industries. Click to download list of companies (.pdf).

Here’s the executive summary: We measured the Net Promoter Score for 269 companies across 19 industries. USAA took the top three spots with NPS of 60 or more for its credit card, banking, and insurance businesses. At the other end of the list, HSBC earned the two lowest scores, with NPS below -20 for its banking and credit card units. Auto dealers (38) and groceries (30) have the highest average NPS, while TV service providers, Internet service providers, and health plans are below 10. In 18 of the 19 industries, consumers who are under 25 represent the lowest (or tied for lowest) NPS scores. Compared with detractors, promoters are more likely to want lower prices and less likely to want customer service improvements. To help you implement a successful NPS program, we’ve included eight tips, such as don’t believe in an “ultimate question” and use control charts, not pinpointed goals. The industries included in this report are airlines, auto dealers, banks, computer makers, credit card issuers, fast food chains, grocery chains, health plans, hotel chains, insurance carriers, Internet service providers, investment firms, major appliance makers, parcel delivery services, rental car agencies, retailers, software firms, TV service providers, and wireless carriers.

This is our second annual NPS benchmark. Check out last year’s results.

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Here are the overall results for the 19 industries:

2013NPSResults_TemkinGroup

Here are some other highlights:

  • USAA earned the highest NPS scores on the list for three of its business—66 for insurance and credit cards and 65 for banking. Other companies with NPS above 50 are Amazon.com, H.E.B., Chick-fil-A, Apple, Audi, credit unions, and Nordstrom.
  • HSBC earned the lowest two NPS scores across all companies with a -42 for banking and -24 for credit cards. Other companies with NPS of -10 or below are Time Warner Cable, Citibank, Super 8, Charter Communications, and Motel 6.
  • Auto dealers earned the highest average NPS (38) followed by grocery chains (30), hotel chains (29), and software firms (29).
  • TV service providers (2), Internet service providers (5), and health plans (9) are the only industries with averages below 10.
  • USAA’s three businesses earned NPS levels that are 40 or more points above their industry averages. Three other firms are 30 or more points above their peers: A credit union (banking), Amazon.com (retail), and H.E.B. (groceries).
  • HSBC’s NPS is 55 points below the industry average for banks and Super 8 is 42 points below the hotel industry. Four other firms are 30 or more points below their industry averages: Motel 6 (hotels), HSBC (credit cards), US Airways (airlines), and 7-Eleven (retail).

Download report and data for $395
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The bottom line: Find out why customers do and don’t recommend you.

*Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

About Bruce Temkin
I am a customer experience transformist, helping large organizations improve business results by changing how they deal with customers. As part of this focus, I examine strategy, marketing, interaction design, customer service, and leadership practices. I am also a fanatical student of business, so this blog provides an outlet for sharing insights from my ongoing educational journey. Simply put, I am passionate about spotting emerging best practices and helping companies master them. And, as many people know, I love to speak about these topics in almost any forum. My “title” is Managing Partner of the Temkin Group, a customer experience research and consulting firm that helps organizations become more customer-centric. Our goal is simple: accelerate the path to delighting customers. I am also the co-founder and chair of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to the success of CX professionals.

6 Responses to Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2013

  1. Suzanne Stuebe says:

    I find it nteresting grocery and auto dealers made the top of the list. They are the only two industries I have experienced that tell you directly how to score them. “Don’t forget, when you are asked, to rate me a five!”

  2. An average sample of 37 per company (10 000/269) surely can not be statistically reliable to report on?

  3. M C Mihalik says:

    Interesting that the bottom 3 industries are the industries with the least amount of competition. Until recently, consumers only had about 2 health plans to choose from. And, when it comes to television service, cable is available to all with satellite only available to those with access (difficult in metropolitan areas with high rises and apartments, etc.) and fiber service is also limited. Appears the more competition, the better it is for business and the consumer.

  4. Temo says:

    what does health plan industry mean? thanks

  5. Interesting that the top-rated ones are mainly shopping/spending money on something you want to, and the ones towards the bottom of the list are largely ones where the purchase is somewhat mandated/essential – and/or a non-retail environment. Makes it important to plan good customer journeys in these businesses.

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