Intensify Emotion Provider Showcase

IntenisfyEmotion2Our research shows that emotion has a significant impact on customer loyalty, yet is almost entirely ignored. To help companies recognize and tap into the power of customer emotion, we started the “Intensify Emotion” campaign.

As part of this campaign, we’ve created the Intensify Emotion Provider Showcase as an opportunity to highlight some of the vendors who are helping their clients discuss, measure, enhance, and design for emotion. Vendors submitted nomination forms to Temkin Group describing the ways in which they help clients emotionally connect with customers.

Given the complicated nature of human emotions, there is no single path companies must follow to engage customer emotions; rather there are any number of possible strategies and methods companies can adopt. To help companies learn about some of the concrete ways they can improve emotions, we wanted to highlight a sample of cutting-edge vendors who are using proven, scalable strategies to Intensify Emotion across organizations. For example, some vendors use facial or voice recognition technologies to identify customer emotions, some create feedback mechanisms that specifically measure emotions, some design for sensory cues that trigger emotions, and others focus on amplifying customer emotion throughout the company.

CONGRATULATIONS to the companies that were selected into the showcase based on the innovativeness of their use cases and the scalability of their products for a large organization (the remainder of this post was directly contributed by the vendors):

  • audEERING GmbH (www.audeering.com): audEERING develops intelligent audio analysis algorithms and provides consulting services to help you integrate next-generation audio analysis technology into your products and your workflow. audEERING’s main area of expertise is automatic emotion recognition from speech signals. Its technology is based on decades of solid, published scientific evidence and uses audEERING’s popular open-source speech and emotion analysis framework openSMILE as core. Here’s the company’s use case:
    • Callyser – Automatic Emotion Recognition from Speech
  • BigEars Ltd (www.bigears.com): BigEars are award-winning world leaders in interactive voice feedback surveys. Founded in 2004, BigEars helps businesses become more profitable by connecting them to their customers in a way not previously possible. Our unique feedback application, Customer Radio, brings feedback to life by making the voice of the customer easy to capture, listen to and share. With BigEars every number has a human experience behind it, giving you answers to questions you never knew to ask.Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Cabot Financial
    • Wellington City Council
  • Cogito (www.cogitocorp.com): Cogito Corporation develops and delivers behavioral analytics software that provides sales, service and care management professionals with the real-time emotional intelligence needed to improve sales results, deliver amazing customer experiences and enhance quality of care. By applying validated behavioral science through artificial intelligence and machine learning, Cogito helps the world’s most successful enterprises enhance employee productivity and better care for their customers. Backed by Romulus Capital and Salesforce.com, Cogito is headquartered in Boston, MA. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Building Emotional Connections On Every Member Phone Conversation 
    • Delivering Better Care Through Real-time Emotional Intelligence
    • Artificial Intelligence Enhances Negotiation Skills
  • Confirmit (www.confirmit.com): Confirmit enables organizations to develop and implement Voice of the Customer, Employee Engagement and Market Research programs that deliver insight and drive business change. Confirmit’s clients create multi-channel, multi-lingual feedback and research programs that engage customers, empower employees, and deliver a compelling respondent experience. Confirmit’s solutions are the most secure, reliable and scalable in the world, and provide technology and expertise that deliver high Return on Investment to leading companies across a range of industries. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Giving the Customer a Seat in the Boardroom 
    • Sony Mobile Corporation: Emotion in Social Media
    • Uncovering Emotion in B2B Sales and Support
  • CrowdEmotion (www.crowdemotion.co.uk): CrowdEmotion is a cloud-based emotion intelligence company that measures emotion in a way that is scalable, insightful and cost-effective. We are a dedicated team on a mission to collect and curate the world’s emotions to further human understanding. To do so, we provide a cloud-based platform where academics and industry can extract emotions from consumer devices to infuse them into the business in a relevant way. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • The Science of Engagement 
    • BBC Worldwide: Tackling the Elephant
  • Fiveworx (www.fiveworx.com): Fiveworx is a customer engagement software platform that was purpose-built for the energy sector. Our custom-built email marketing and marketing automation software uses persona-based messaging and journeys (derived from proprietary polling of 80,000 Americans on their opinions, behaviors and attitudes around energy and environment) to tap into energy customers’ deeper emotional drivers and engage and motivate them to act, increasing customer participation in utility programs, products and services; improving customer satisfaction, and delivering energy savings. Here’s the company’s use case:
    • Alliant Energy in Wisconsin takes utility customer engagement to a new level
  • Man Made Music (www.manmademusic.com): Man Made Music is a strategic music and sound studio. We score entertainment and brand experiences by creating unique sonic identity systems that can be woven through brand touchpoints – communications, devices, customer support and immersive environments. Because people have instinctive and visceral emotional reactions to music and sound, our work helps brands efficiently and effectively convey meaning and strengthen emotional connections with their audiences, by providing more familiar and desirable brand experiences. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Using Sonic Identity to Better Connect Across Touchpoints
    • Using Sonic Identity to Galvanize People Around an Organization’s Mission
    • Using Sonic Identity to Ignite Emotion in Immersive Environments: IMAX
  • Mattersight (mattersight.com): Mattersight’s mission is to help brands have better conversations with their customers. Using a suite of innovative personality-based software applications, Mattersight can analyze and predict customer behavior based on the language exchanged during service and sales interactions. This insight can then facilitate real-time connections between customers and the agents best capable of handling their needs. Fortune 500 enterprises rely on Mattersight to drive customer retention, employee engagement and operating efficiency. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Predicting NPS outcomes for 100% of conversations through measuring emotions
    • Fortune 20 healthcare leader slashes costs in call-center through better emotional connections

Details of Intensify Emotion Providers

Here are the detailed submissions from the vendors (we did not edit these): Read more of this post

Report: Emotion-Infused Experience Design

1606_EmotionInfusedExperienceDesign_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Emotion-Infused Experience Design.

Emotions play an essential role in how people make decisions. Consequently, how a customer feels about their experience with a company has the most significant impact on their loyalty to that company. And yet despite their importance, both customers and companies agree that organizations do a poor job of engaging customers’ emotions. To help companies create a stronger emotional connection with customers, we’ve developed an approach called Emotion-Infused Experience Design (EIxD). To master EIxD, organizations must continuously focus on three questions: “Who exactly are these people (who happen to be our customers)?” “What is our organizational personality?” and “How do we want customers to feel?” This report offers both advice and examples about how to apply these three questions across four facets that affect emotion: senses, feelings, social, and values. And to help infuse these practices across the organization, we have also identified some strategies for how to turn employees into agents of EIxD.

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Our research shows that emotion is often a missing link in customer experience. While emotions may seem ephemeral and subjective, we developed a concrete methodology you can use to design for emotion. We call this methodology “Emotion-Infused Experience Design” (EIxD), and we define it as:

An approach for deliberately creating interactions that evoke specific customer emotions.

To master EIxD, you must ask (and answer) three questions throughout the entire design process:

  1. Who exactly are these people (who happen to be our customers)? You cannot design emotionally engaging experiences without a solid grasp on who your target customers are—what they want, what they need, what makes them tick.
  2. What is our organizational personality? Research shows that people relate to companies as if they are fellow human beings rather than inanimate corporate entities.
  3. How do we want our customers to feel? People are inherently emotional beings, and every interaction they have with you will make them feel a certain way—whether you intend it to or not.

To address the three questions of EIxD, this report shows how to design around four elements of emotion: senses, feelings, social, and values. Here are two of the 26 figures in the report:

1606_TwoPartsofEmotion1605_CokeStarbucksEmotions

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Epidemic of Emotionless Experience Design

As I’ve discussed many times on this blog, customers experience interactions across three dimensions, Success, Effort, and Emotion. So how effective are companies at proactively designing for those elements? Not very.

In our latest CX management study, we surveyed 252 companies with at least $100 million in annual revenues and asked them about their experience design effectiveness. As you can see in the graphic below:

  • Only about one in 10 companies is very good at proactively designing for any aspect of customer experience.
  • More companies are good at designing for success (completion on interactions) than effort or emotion, but less than half of companies consider themselves good in this area.
  • Emotion is the weakest link, as only about one-third of companies think they are good at proactive emotional design.

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If companies don’t improve their experience design skills, then their customer experience will never be better than inconsistent. And the biggest problem is emotion, which happens to drive the most loyalty.

If you want to fix this problem, we’ve got some help. Keep an eye on this blog for a new Temkin Group report on emotional experience design, which we’ll be publishing in a couple of weeks.

The bottom line: Join the Intensity Emotion Movement!

Quick Take: The Power of Customer Journey Thinking (Video)

In a recent Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org) CustomerSpark event in Dallas, I spoke about the importance of focusing on emotion. Given that we’ve called 2016 “The Year of Emotion,” this is a popular topic for Temkin Group.

Here’s a short snippet from my speech (one of several quick take videos from the event), which focuses on the power of Customer Journey Thinking™:

 

Want more information on Customer Journey Thinking? Check out the post, Five Questions That Drive Customer Journey Thinking.

And don’t forget to join the Intensify Emotion Movement.
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Quick Take: Start Talking About Emotion (Video)

In a recent Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org) CustomerSpark event in Dallas, I spoke about the importance of focusing on emotion. Give that we’ve called 2016 “The Year of Emotion,” this is a popular topic for Temkin Group.

Here’s a short snippet from my speech (one of several quick take videos from the event) where I discuss why we need to Start Talking About Emotion:

 

For more information on the Five A’s of an emotional response, check out this post: Customer Responses, From Angry To Adoring.

And, I urge you to join the Intensify Emotion Movement.

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Quick Take: We Need More Qualitative Research (Video)

In a recent Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org) CustomerSpark event in Dallas, I spoke about the importance of focusing on emotion. Give that we’ve called 2016 “The Year of Emotion,” this is a popular topic for Temkin Group.

Here’s a short snippet from my speech (one of several quick take videos from the event), where I discuss that We Need More Qualitative Research:

 

I urge you to join the Intensify Emotion Movement.

IntensifyEmotionLogo

Quick Take: Customer Experience: Success, Effort, and Emotion (Video)

In a recent Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org) CustomerSpark event in Dallas, I spoke about the importance of focusing on emotion. Give that we’ve called 2016 “The Year of Emotion,” this is a popular topic for Temkin Group.

Here’s a short snippet from my speech (one of several quick take videos from the event) where I discuss the three elements of customer experience, Success, Effort, and Emotion:


If you enjoyed this video, you may want to check out another one: What is Customer Experience?

I urge you to join the Intensify Emotion Movement.

IntensifyEmotionLogo

Quick Take: Make More Human Emotional Connections (Video)

In a recent Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org) CustomerSpark event in Dallas, I spoke about the importance of focusing on emotion. Give that we’ve called 2016 “The Year of Emotion,” this is a popular topic for Temkin Group.

Here’s a short snippet from my speech (one of several quick take videos from the event), where I discuss how we need to Make More Human Emotional Connections:

I urge you to join the Intensify Emotion Movement.

IntensifyEmotionLogo

The Emotional Decline From New Purchase To Customer Service

How do consumers feel about their purchases and subsequent customer service interactions? To find the answer, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about those experiences across 11 different industries. We used their responses to calculate the Temkin Emotion Ratings. As you can see below:

  • Across all industries, purchasing provides a more positive emotional response than customer service. The gap in Temkin Emotion Ratings goes from 11 points (health plans) to 49 points (TV/Internet service).
  • New car purchases earn the highest Temkin Emotion Ratings.
  • Customer service interactions with TV/Internet service providers earn (by far) the worst emotion ratings (6%). The next worst emotional experience–health plan customer service (18%)–is three times better than the TV/Internet service providers.
  • Purchasing a new health plan provide the lowest emotional rating of any purchase, but it is also has the smallest gap when compared to the emotional ratings for health plan customer service.

1602_EmotionRatingsPurchaseAndCustomerService

The bottom line: Customer service is an emotional trough.

Emotion: The Missing Link in Customer Experience (Video)

Enjoy this Temkin Group video, part of our celebration for “The Year of Emotion.

Enjoy other Temkin Group videos

11 Customer Experience Trends for 2016 (The Year of Emotion)

WatchRecordedWebinarIt’s once again the time of year for me to publish my CX trends. In my post last year I named 2015 “The Year of Employee.” With this post, I’m declaring 2016 “The Year of Emotion.”

1512_CXTrends4In the upcoming year, CX will continue to grow in importance for companies and an even larger number of organizations will begin their CX journeys. In this environment, we expect to see:

  1. Culture Change Intensifying. WatchRecordedWebinarPeter Drucker once said, “Culture eats strategy for lunch.” We agree and believe that customer experience is a reflection an organization’s culture and operating processes. As you can see in our video Driving CX Transformation, customer-centric culture requires mastering four CX core competenciesPurposeful LeadershipCompelling Brand ValuesEmployee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness. We saw a surge of interest in the topic of culture in 2015, and we expect even more executives to begin the long-term journey of culture change in 2016.
  2. Effort Metric Expanding.WatchRecordedWebinar Every interaction has three components: Success, Effort, and Emotion. Companies have started to use versions of an “effort” score as a key CX metric, because it provides a good mechanism for identifying areas of improvement. We expect this trend to intensify, and for effort to become a more mainstream topic next year. See the 2015 Temkin Effort Ratings.
  3. Customer Journey Designing. WatchRecordedWebinarCustomer journey mapping has become one of the most popular CX tools as it helps provide a customer-oriented viewpoint. While many of these efforts have been heavily focused on isolated mapping events, we expect to see companies use the lessons from CJM to drive more decisions and changes across their organizations. As this happens, we recommend that more companies adopt what we call Customer Journey Thinking©.
  4. Mobile, Mobile, Mobile… Continuing. Mobile continues to become a more dominant interaction channel… and through increasingly varied types of devices. In 2016, we expect more companies to get beyond the basic level of making mobile-friendly websites and launching mobile apps. Organizations will rethink their offerings and operating processes, baking in assumptions that customers and employees are continuously connected.
  5. Speech Analytics Piloting. As companies get comfortable using text analytics and collecting customer insights from unstructured data, they often focus on their largest interaction dataset: contact center calls. While the technology has limited the use of speech analytics in the past, we believe 2016 will be the tipping point and expect to see a flutter of companies with speech analytics pilots.
  6. Predictive Analytics Personalizing.WatchRecordedWebinar As companies connect rich customer feedback with reams of CRM and operational data, the value of predictive modeling will rise exponentially. In 2016, we expect to see firms that have built data hubs over the last few years investing in predictive modeling and using the insights to develop a more personalized treatment of customers.
  7. Metrics to Action Realigning. WatchRecordedWebinarVoice of the customer programs (including NPS), are a mainstream component of most CX programs. But these efforts overly focus on collecting data at the expense of taking action on the insights. The problem stems from a desire to measure and track everything, which ends up consuming much of VoC teams’ capacity and budget. Next year we expect an increasing number of companies to shift their emphasis from tracking metrics to enabling action. As this occurs, they will lower their reliance on multiple-choice ratings scales to focus more on unstructured sources (comments, contact center interactions, etc.) and will increase their use of more qualitative techniques such as customer interviews and ethnography.
  8. Value-as-a-Service Emerging. As consumers get comfortable with companies like Uber and AirBnB and use more iTunes apps and cloud-based applications, they are being trained to pay for things as they need them. The notion of buying something that you may or may not use in the future is becoming outdated. In 2016, we expect this consumer behavior to push more companies to break apart their offerings into bite-sized pieces. As this happens companies will need to earn loyalty more frequently and ensure that customers get value from the things that they purchase.
  9. Employee CX & Empathy Training. WatchRecordedWebinarAs more companies roll out their CX change efforts, we expect to see them look for ways to train large groups of employees – to teach them basic CX concepts and to instill a sense of customer empathy. Why? Because more firms realize that sustainable CX success requires engaging employees — not simply introducing processes changes and expecting “blind” compliance. In 2016, the need for this training will grow rapidly, and CX professionals will respond by working with their training departments and outside consultants.
  10. CX Profession Maturing. WatchRecordedWebinarCustomer experience has come a long way over the last few years, as CX practitioners have shared lessons learned and improved upon best practices. Nothing illustrates this maturity better than the Customer Experience Professionals Association and the increasing number of Certified Customer Experience Professionals. As this trend continues, we expect to see CX professionals become more focused on helping their organizations achieve business and brand objectives. This will change their role from experts of tools to collaborators of change.
  11. Emotion Arising. WatchRecordedWebinarOur research shows that emotion is the component of customer experience that has the largest impact on loyalty, but it is also the area where companies are least adept and often seemingly ignore. Over the past few years, neuroscience and behavioral science research has begun to fuel new techniques for affecting human emotions. In 2016, we expect to see a major jump in the number of companies that discuss, measure, and design for emotion. It will also become a hot topic at CX conferences.

CXTrend_YearOfEmotion
The bottom line: Happy 2016, and enjoy the Year of Emotion!

Customer Experience Needs More Emotion (Infographic)

As the title of this post says, CX needs more emotion. If you like this infographic, then you can download this version in .pdf or download a 18″ x 24″ poster version).

1512_EmotionInfographic

The bottom line: Let’s put more emotion into CX!

Emotions, Behaviors, CX, and Colin Shaw

Are Customer Emotions & Behaviors the Future of Customer Experience? That’s a question that Colin Shaw and I recently discussed/debated during a joint webinar. You can see a recording of the session below.

If you don’t have time to watch the recording, then here’s a quick summary: “Yes!

Customer experience is all about people (human beings!) who don’t behave as rationally as many people tend to believe, and they are often driven to action based on their emotions. Customer experience efforts must do a much better job of dealing with this reality, with both customers and employees.

Here’s some related content:

The bottom line: Great customer experience requires a strong focus on emotions & behaviors.

Report: Behavioral Guide to Customer Experience Design

1506_BehavioralGuideToExperienceDesign_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Behavioral Guide to Customer Experience Design. Here’s the executive summary:

According to recent scientific research, customers make most of their decisions using intuitive thinking instead of rational thinking. Intuitive thinking relies on unconscious heuristics and biases to make decisions efficiently, and as a result, people tend to be more affected by losses than by gains, to prefer simplicity over complexity, to be affected by their current emotional and visceral states, to be heavily influenced by those around them, to make decisions based on context, and to misjudge their past and future experiences. In this report, we identify best practices for tapping into these heuristics and biases across three areas of experience design; companies can Nudge customers in the right direction, Assist them in accomplishing their goals, and Enhance their overall experience. To incorporate intuitive thinking into experience design, companies need to follow four steps: define target customers, identify relevant heuristics and biases, select design strategies, and then test, test, test.

Download report for $195
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Here are tactics for applying these human biases in your experience design efforts that we describe in the report:

1507_BehavioralDesignTactics

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The bottom line: Embrace your customers’ natural behaviors.

Positive Psychology Meets Customer Experience


See webinar with Bruce Temkin and Aimee Lucas:
Infusing Customer Experience With Positive Psychology


1506_PPplusCX

Last week, the Temkin Group leadership team attended the World Congress on Positive Psychology in Orlando. Kudos to the International Positive Psychology Association for putting on such a great event. It was inspirational for us, as it confirmed what we fundamentally believed; positive psychology can be an incredibly valuable tool within the world of customer experience.

What is Positive Psychology?

Before we go any further, I want to make sure everyone understands what positive psychology is all about. Here’s the definition from the Positive Psychology Center:

Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths that enable individuals and communities to thrive. The field is founded on the belief that people want to lead meaningful and fulfilling lives, to cultivate what is best within themselves, and to enhance their experiences of love, work, and play.

It’s a new branch of psychology where the emphasis is not on fixing psychological ailments, but on helping people “flourish.” You may want to read the book Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being by Martin Seligman, who many consider the godfather of the positive psychology movement.

Highlights from the World Congress

Seligman was one of the keynote speakers at the event, which included the who’s-who list for positive psychology. Here’s a small dose of highlights from the keynote speakers:

  • Martin Seligman, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. The latest research is showing that helplessness is a natural reaction in the brain and rather than trying to unlearn it, it is possible to create a “hope circuit” in the brain by building an expectation of control or mastery of the situation. In the World Well-Being Project, positive psychologists are now monitoring world wellbeing by creating word clouds based on millions of social media from around the world. What emerges is a clear picture that positive and negative emotions each have their own lexicon. The question this research raises: if we can change the words people use, can we change their life satisfaction?
  • Tal Ben-Shahar, Ph.D.: When it comes to understanding and helping people through change, rather than studying a “sample of the average,” study the “growing tip” where individuals or organizations are performing at their best. This shift to focusing on peak performance can help to “democratize excellence” and push through what Goleman has referred to has the “honeymoon effect,” where after some initial success the change is not sustained over the long term.
  • David Cooperrider, Ph.D., Case Western University: Flourishing enterprises support the development and engagement of their people and have a culture and identity based on sustainable values. As he put it, “human beings are not a resource that gets used up, but are a source that can intensify and increase in value and contributions.” These sorts of organizations can be agents of world benefit, and Cooperrider put the spotlight on efforts like Google’s Balloon Project, that brings Internet connectivity to extremely rural areas lacking infrastructure through the use of large balloons. To discover and design positive institutions, we have to view organizations as solutions and use techniques like appreciative intelligence to bring out the best in the system (and the people within the system) in order to drive change at the scale of the whole.
  • Jonathan Haidt, Ph.D., New York University: Haidt put forth that capitalism is the most transformative force since the domestication of fire. And in order to “increase the total tonnage of happiness around the world,” capitalism can be a means to create the right kind of happiness. Rising prosperity brings rising security in society, which lets the attention shift away from simply surviving. With that shift comes a change in values away from the traditional, a push for greater freedom, investments in education (especially for women), and additional powerful benefits for society.
  • Tom Rath, Gallup Consulting: To have the energy they need for sustainable performance, people require three things: meaningful work, quality interactions, and energy. Meaningful work aligns our interests and natural talents with the needs of others. Quality interactions are those relationships with people we enjoy being around, which can have a profound impact on individual health and wellbeing. Energy comes from recognizing that how we eat, move, and sleep work in parallel. Across all three elements, small wins can generate meaningful outcomes when it comes to individual wellbeing.
  • Rollin McCraty, Ph.D., Institute of Heartmath: Of the four energy domains—physical, emotional, mental, spiritual—the emotional domain is the primary driver of physiology and is the biggest way to lose or gain energy as a result. Researchers have identified a nerve center within the heart that sends signals to the brain to help regulate emotion. It is possible to apply some specific techniques to control variable heart rate and self-regulate emotion in order to build capacity for resilience and sustain energy over time.
  • Barbara Fredrickson, Ph.D., University of North Carolina: The center of this presentation was the Upward Spiral Theory of Lifestyle Change, still a work in process in the research world. Early findings show that the more you enjoy a wellness behavior you undertake (swimming, meditation, etc.), the more you will have spontaneous positive thoughts about that activity resulting in an increased passion for that behavior. In short: you are more likely to stick with a wellness behavior over time if you enjoy it from the start. With the upward spiral, wellness behaviors become more rewarding over time and our motives to pursue them also increate over time. When it comes to prioritizing positivity, people should be proactive about arranging their day to incorporate activities that increase their positive emotions rather than trying to “will themselves happy.”

Infusing Positive Psychology Into Customer Experience

Hopefully this brief introduction to positive psychology has made it clear why there is so much potential value for customer experience.

To make the connection explicit, here are three of the many themes from positive psychology that we will be infusing into our work:

  • Positive emotions support sustained behavior change. People are more apt to continue an activity if it results in positive emotions, which supports more sustainable results than sheer personal willpower.
  • Positive emotions increase human capacity. People are more thoughtful, creative, and adaptive when they experience positive emotions, and it also improves their physiological health and well-being.
  • Meaningful work amplifies positive emotions. People experience more positive emotions when they find meaning in their work, and this can be heightened when their work and efforts are appreciated.

We believe that these themes can affect every aspect of customer experience. Here are some of the many ways that they connect with our four customer experience core competencies:

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Positive Psychology Within Temkin Group Research 

We plan to increase our focus on positive psychology within Temkin Group’s research and advisory services, but positive psychology is not a new theme for us. You can see elements of it across many of the things that we’ve already published, including:

The bottom line: Positive psychology and customer experience are a natural fit.

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