Report: Behavioral Guide to Customer Experience Design

1506_BehavioralGuideToExperienceDesign_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Behavioral Guide to Customer Experience Design. Here’s the executive summary:

According to recent scientific research, customers make most of their decisions using intuitive thinking instead of rational thinking. Intuitive thinking relies on unconscious heuristics and biases to make decisions efficiently, and as a result, people tend to be more affected by losses than by gains, to prefer simplicity over complexity, to be affected by their current emotional and visceral states, to be heavily influenced by those around them, to make decisions based on context, and to misjudge their past and future experiences. In this report, we identify best practices for tapping into these heuristics and biases across three areas of experience design; companies can Nudge customers in the right direction, Assist them in accomplishing their goals, and Enhance their overall experience. To incorporate intuitive thinking into experience design, companies need to follow four steps: define target customers, identify relevant heuristics and biases, select design strategies, and then test, test, test.

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Here are tactics for applying these human biases in your experience design efforts that we describe in the report:

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The bottom line: Embrace your customers’ natural behaviors.

The Power of Customer Journey Mapping (Video)

Customer journey mapping is a valuable tool for customer experience, but Customer Journey Thinking can change your culture. Watch this short Temkin Group video to find out more…

The bottom line: Your customers are on a journey, help them

Is Net Promoter Score A Savior Or A Demon?

Every couple of years, I get a resurgence of questions about Net Promoter® Score (NPS®). These surges typically coincide with research that shows how NPS is either an excellent predictor or a terrible predictor of company performance. That data often ignites a religious battle between the NPS lovers and NPS haters.

Well, it’s one of those times.

Let me start by saying that I’m an atheist in this NPS battle. We’ve had the opportunity to study and work with hundreds of companies that use NPS. I’ve recommended to some companies that they adopt NPS, to others that they stop using NPS, and to others that they start with a totally different set of metrics (see our VoC/NPS resource page).

Let’s look at what we know for sure about NPS…

The reality is that the metric itself is much less important than how it is used. I’d rather use a sub-optimal metric in a way that drives positive improvements across an organization, than have a perfect metric that doesn’t result in as much impact.

Here are some quick answers to key questions:

  • Is NPS the best indicator of customer loyalty and business performance? In many cases, no.
  • Can other metrics be used to drive positive change? Yes.
  • Does NPS provide an easy to understand metric that can be widely adopted? Yes.
  • Can NPS be used to make an organization more customer centric? In many cases, yes.
  • Will a company improve if it increases promoters and decreases detractors? In many cases, yes.
  • Can NPS be used inappropriately? Yes.
  • Can any metric be used inappropriately? Yes.
  • Would I ever recommend NPS for every touch point? No.
  • Should companies consider their specific business when selecting metrics? Absolutely.
  • What’s more important, the metric or the improvement process? The improvement process.

The bottom line: NPS is neither a savior nor a demon.

P.S. In case you didn’t know, NPS® and Net Promoter® are registered trademarks of Fred Reichheld, Satmetrix, and Bain & Company.

Report: Unlocking Customer Insights From Contact Centers

1505_UnlockingInsightsFromContactCenters_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Unlocking Customer Insights From Contact Centers: From Agent Productivity to Enterprise Intelligence. Here’s the executive summary:

Companies have traditionally viewed their contact centers as cost centers and have consequently focused most of their energy on making agents as efficient as possible. However, companies are now beginning to realize that contact centers actually contain a wealth of deep, untapped information about customers. Temkin Group recommends that companies tap into this rich vein of information by shifting their focus away from agent productivity and towards enterprise intelligence. To construct a more holistic picture of their customers’ experiences, companies should take the unsolicited, unstructured voice of the customer (VoC) feedback they capture in the contact center and combine it with data they collect from other sources, such as CRM and digital analytics. In this report, we outline how companies’ efforts should shift across each of the Six D’s of a VOC program: Detect, Disseminate, Diagnose, Discuss, Design, and Deploy. To start the transformation away from agent productivity and towards enterprise intelligence, companies need to focus on data integration, analyzing the entire customer journey, forming a cohesive governance structure, and developing new roles and skills for employees.

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In the report, we describe these best practices for shifting the focus of customer insights in the contact center from agent effectiveness to enterprise insights:

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Hospital (Almost) Provides Valuable Patient Status

In a recent visit to a hospital, a member of my family spotted this patient status screen. It’s a great concept, keeping family members up to speed on the status of their beloved patient as he or she is in surgery. While it’s a wonderful idea, the design falls flat. Take a look at the confusing status items:

1506_TuftsPatientStatusThis is an example of what I call the Design of Little Things (DoLT). So many organizations invest in good ideas, but fail to do the little things that will create a really positive experience for customers. It’s like running a marathon and then giving up right before the finish line.

In this case, the idea of a real-time status screen is great, but the hospital needs to provide status items that are meaningful for family members in the waiting room. All it would take is one more tweak and this would be a wonderful tool.

The bottom line: Don’t neglect the DoLT

 

Temkin Group’s SLICE-B Experience Review Methodology (Video)

Do you want to examine experiences through the eyes of your customers? Try using Temkin Group’s SLICE-B Experience Review Methodology.

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Download SLICE-B Scorecard (.pdf)

SLICE-B is an Expert Review (a.k.a. Scenario Review) methodology where you go through a specific scenario with a specific customer type in mind, looking for experience flaws along the way. Our methodology examines 12 criteria across these six areas:

  1. Start. The extent to which the customer is drawn into the experience.
  2. Locate. The ease in which the customer can find what she needs.
  3. Interact. The ease in which the customer can understand and control the experience.
  4. Complete. The confidence that the customer has that her goal was accomplished.
  5. End. The transition into next steps.
  6. Brand Coherence. The reinforcement of a company’s brand.

To see SLICE-B in use, download the report: Evaluating Mobile eGift Card Purchasing Experiences.

The bottom line: Examining experiences through the eyes of your customers can be enlightening.

 

Data Snapshot: Social Media Benchmark, 2015

1505_DS_SocialMediaBenchmark2015_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Social Media Benchmark, 2015. This is our annual analysis of how consumers use different social media sites on computers as well as on mobile phones (see last year’s data snapshot).

Here’s the data snapshot description:

In January 2015, we surveyed 10,000 U.S. consumers about how frequently they use social media on their computers and mobile phones, and we then compared these usage rates to analogous data we collected in January 2012, January 2013, and January 2014. This analysis looks at the frequency with which consumers in different age groups use computers and mobile phones to access Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and third-party rating sites. We also examine how usage rates vary by mobile phone type.

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This research has 14 data-rich graphics. Here’s a portion of one showing the daily social media activity via both computers and mobile devices for U.S. consumers:

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Some of the findings form the research include:

  • Consumers increased their daily computer usage across all nine social media sites we examined. While daily Facebook access showed the smallest increase, from 46.5% in 2014 to 47.1% in 2015, Twitter jumped the most as daily computer users increased from 13.4% to 16.1% over the past year.
  • Social media activity grew even faster on mobile devices. Daily mobile usage of Facebook increased the most, from 29.3% in 2014 to 36.1% in 2015. Pinterest showed the most momentum, growing its audience of daily mobile users from 8.0% to 11.4% over the last year.
  • The youngest group of consumers we studied, those between the ages of 18 and 24, lowered their daily computer usage of Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, as well as with ratings and review sites like Yelp and TripAdvisor. Those young adults also lowered their daily mobile use of LinkedIn and Google+.
  • These young adults are very mobile-centric, as they are more likely to use Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Pinterest daily on their mobile devices than on their computers.
  • Consumers between the ages of 25 and 34 are the most active on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, and ratings sites.
  • Across both computers and mobile devices, consumers between 35- and 44-years-old showed the most increase in daily social media activity between 2014 and 2015.
  • iPhone users are the most active on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest, while Blackberry users are the most active on LinkedIn, Tumblr, and ratings sites.

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The bottom line: Mobile use continues to rise

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