Hospital (Almost) Provides Valuable Patient Status

In a recent visit to a hospital, a member of my family spotted this patient status screen. It’s a great concept, keeping family members up to speed on the status of their beloved patient as he or she is in surgery. While it’s a wonderful idea, the design falls flat. Take a look at the confusing status items:

1506_TuftsPatientStatusThis is an example of what I call the Design of Little Things (DoLT). So many organizations invest in good ideas, but fail to do the little things that will create a really positive experience for customers. It’s like running a marathon and then giving up right before the finish line.

In this case, the idea of a real-time status screen is great, but the hospital needs to provide status items that are meaningful for family members in the waiting room. All it would take is one more tweak and this would be a wonderful tool.

The bottom line: Don’t neglect the DoLT

 

Temkin Group’s SLICE-B Experience Review Methodology (Video)

Do you want to examine experiences through the eyes of your customers? Try using Temkin Group’s SLICE-B Experience Review Methodology.

1505_SliceBAssessment

Download SLICE-B Scorecard (.pdf)

SLICE-B is an Expert Review (a.k.a. Scenario Review) methodology where you go through a specific scenario with a specific customer type in mind, looking for experience flaws along the way. Our methodology examines 12 criteria across these six areas:

  1. Start. The extent to which the customer is drawn into the experience.
  2. Locate. The ease in which the customer can find what she needs.
  3. Interact. The ease in which the customer can understand and control the experience.
  4. Complete. The confidence that the customer has that her goal was accomplished.
  5. End. The transition into next steps.
  6. Brand Coherence. The reinforcement of a company’s brand.

To see SLICE-B in use, download the report: Evaluating Mobile eGift Card Purchasing Experiences.

The bottom line: Examining experiences through the eyes of your customers can be enlightening.

 

Data Snapshot: Social Media Benchmark, 2015

1505_DS_SocialMediaBenchmark2015_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Social Media Benchmark, 2015. This is our annual analysis of how consumers use different social media sites on computers as well as on mobile phones (see last year’s data snapshot).

Here’s the data snapshot description:

In January 2015, we surveyed 10,000 U.S. consumers about how frequently they use social media on their computers and mobile phones, and we then compared these usage rates to analogous data we collected in January 2012, January 2013, and January 2014. This analysis looks at the frequency with which consumers in different age groups use computers and mobile phones to access Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and third-party rating sites. We also examine how usage rates vary by mobile phone type.

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This research has 14 data-rich graphics. Here’s a portion of one showing the daily social media activity via both computers and mobile devices for U.S. consumers:

1505_SocialMediaCOmputerMobile

Some of the findings form the research include:

  • Consumers increased their daily computer usage across all nine social media sites we examined. While daily Facebook access showed the smallest increase, from 46.5% in 2014 to 47.1% in 2015, Twitter jumped the most as daily computer users increased from 13.4% to 16.1% over the past year.
  • Social media activity grew even faster on mobile devices. Daily mobile usage of Facebook increased the most, from 29.3% in 2014 to 36.1% in 2015. Pinterest showed the most momentum, growing its audience of daily mobile users from 8.0% to 11.4% over the last year.
  • The youngest group of consumers we studied, those between the ages of 18 and 24, lowered their daily computer usage of Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, as well as with ratings and review sites like Yelp and TripAdvisor. Those young adults also lowered their daily mobile use of LinkedIn and Google+.
  • These young adults are very mobile-centric, as they are more likely to use Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Pinterest daily on their mobile devices than on their computers.
  • Consumers between the ages of 25 and 34 are the most active on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, and ratings sites.
  • Across both computers and mobile devices, consumers between 35- and 44-years-old showed the most increase in daily social media activity between 2014 and 2015.
  • iPhone users are the most active on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest, while Blackberry users are the most active on LinkedIn, Tumblr, and ratings sites.

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The bottom line: Mobile use continues to rise

Data Snapshot: Media Use Benchmark, 2015

1504_DS_MediaBenchmark2015_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Media Use Benchmark, 2015. This is our annual analysis of how much time consumers spend using different media channels (see last year’s data snapshot).

Here’s the data snapshot description:

In January 2015, we surveyed 10,000 U.S. consumers about their media usage patterns and compared the results to similar data we collected in January 2014, January 2013, and January 2012. Our analysis examines the amount of time consumers spend every day watching television, browsing the Internet (for both work and leisure), reading books (both print and electronic), reading newspapers (both print and electronic), listening to the radio, reading a print magazine, and using a mobile phone. This data snapshot breaks down the results by income level, education level, and, most expansively, by age.

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Use of mobile phones for internet or app-related consumption increased an average of 0.4 hours per day over the past year. This is the largest jump in average usage time over all 11 areas we examined in both 2014 and 2015. Respondents under the age of 35 dedicate the most amount of time to all of these activities, with the exception of TV watching, which is most heavily consumed by 65- to 74-year-olds.

Here’s a portion of the first figure from the data snapshot that contains 12 data-rich charts:

1504_MediaUseHours

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The bottom line: Mobile use continues to rise

Data Snapshot: Customer Experience Expectations and Plans for 2015

1503_DS_CXPlansFor2015_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Customer Experience Expectations and Plans for 2015. This is our annual analysis of CX priorities and spending within large organizations (see last year’s data snapshot).

Here’s the data snapshot description:

In the first quarter of 2015, Temkin Group surveyed 207 respondents, each from a company with $500 million or more in annual revenues, about their customer experience efforts over the past year and their plans for 2015 and beyond. We compared the results of this survey to the results of similar surveys that we completed in Q4 of 2010, Q4 of 2011, Q4 of 2012, and Q4 of 2013. This year’s results show that companies are planning on dedicating more money and effort to improving a variety of customer experience activities in 2015.

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Here are some highlights from the data snapshot that contains 13 data-rich charts:

  • 42% of respondents think their CX efforts had a moderately or significantly positive impact on the business in 2014 and 78% expect to have a positive impact in 2015.
  • 82% of respondents think that CX will be more important to their organization this year than it was last year.
  • 66% of respondents expect that their company will spend more on CX this year than it did last year.
  • 40% of respondents have more than five people in their centralized CX team and 42% expect those numbers to rise (none are expecting a decline).
  • 31% of respondents expect to spend more on voice of the customer software vendors in 2015 than they did in 2014 and only 2% expect to spend less.
  • 88% of respondents expect to put more focus on Web experiences in 2015, a jump from 79% that expected to do the same last year. Social media and phone self-service interactions were the only areas that did not gain momentum.
  • 81% of respondents expect to put more focus on customer insights and analytics. The largest jump from last year is employee communications and engagement.
  • Building a customer-centric culture and predictive analytics are the areas that jumped the most this year when respondents identified the things that would have a significant impact on their organization’s CX in three years.

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The bottom line: Companies will be spending more time and money on CX this year

Report: 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings

1503_TemkinExperienceRatings_COVERTemkin Ratings websiteWe published the 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings, the most comprehensive benchmark of customer experience. In the fifth year of the Ratings, we analyze feedback from 10,000 U.S. consumers to rate 293 organizations across 20 industries (we added utilities this year). Here’s the executive summary:

2015 marks the fifth year of the Temkin Experience Ratings, and this year, supermarkets dominated the ratings. Publix earned the top spot, closely followed by Aldi and H-E-B. In addition to earning the top three positions, supermarkets also took five of the top 12 spots. Retailers also performed well, with both PetSmart and Amazon.com making it into the top seven. At the other end of the spectrum, Coventry Health Care, Fox Rent A Car, Comcast, and Fujitsu earned the lowest ratings. To generate the Temkin Experience Ratings, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers to rate their recent interactions with 293 companies across 20 industries and then evaluated their experiences across three dimensions: success, effort, and emotion. On an industry level, supermarket chains, fast food chains, retailers, parcel delivery services, and banks all earned “good” ratings on average, whereas Internet service providers, TV service providers, and health plans received “poor” ratings on average. We also compared individual companies to their industry averages and found that TriCare and Amazon outperformed their industry peers by the highest margin, while Fox Rent A Car and Ramada Inn fell the furthest below their industry average. Between 2014 and 2015, only five industries improved and 14 declined. Residence Inn, US Cellular, and JetBlue Airlines improved the most over the previous year, while Subaru dealers, TD Ameritrade, and Buick dealers declined the most.

Download report for FreeFreeDownloadButton You can also download the dataset in Excel for $395

See our post with FAQs about the Temkin Experience Ratings.

The Temkin Experience Ratings are based on evaluating three elements of experience:

  1. Success: How well do experiences meet customers’ needs?
  2. Effort: How easy is it for customers to do what they want to do?
  3. Emotion: How do customers feel about the experiences?

Here are the top and bottom companies in the ratings:

***See how your company can reference these results or
display a badge for top 10% and industry leaders***

2015TxR_TopBottom
Here’s how the industries compare with each other:

2015TxR_Industries

1502_TxR_Companies

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You can also download the dataset in Excel for $395

Get the Data

Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 5.42.22 PMDo you want to see all of the data from the 2015 Temkin Experience Ratings? You can purchase an excel spreadsheet for $395. Here’s a sample of the spreadsheet (.xls).

To view all of our ratings (experience, trust, forgiveness, customer service, and web experience), visit the Temkin Ratings website

Temkin Ratings website

The bottom line: Companies have a long way to go on their CX journeys.

Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2015

1502_WhatHappensAfterGoodBadExper_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2015. This is our annual analysis of which companies deliver the most and least bad experiences, how consumers respond after those experience (in terms of sharing those experiences and changing their purchase behaviors), and the effect of service recovery (see last year’s report).

Here’s the executive summary:

To understand the effect of good and bad experiences, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with 283 companies across 20 industries. Internet service providers and TV service providers deliver bad experiences more frequently than any other industries, as exemplified by Comcast and Charter Communications, each of which delivers a bad experience to about one in four customers, the most of any companies. Retailers, on the other hand, are least likely to deliver a negative experience. Out of all the industries, customers are most likely to stop spending completely after a bad experience with a computer and tablet maker, and they are most likely to reduce spending after a bad experience with a fast food chain. The economics of service recovery are compelling. Compared with companies that deliver a very poor response after a bad experience, companies that deliver a very good response have 41% fewer consumers cutting back on their spending and 31% more increasing their spending. Led by investment firms and major appliance makers, all industries improved or maintained their service recovery performance from last year. After a very bad or very good experience, consumers are more likely to give feedback back directly to the company than they are to post on Facebook, Twitter, or third party rating sites. These social sites, however, are still an important channel for consumers under the age of 45. When it comes to sharing bad experiences on social media, customers of Advantage Rent A Car and Alabama Power Company are the most likely to post about it on Facebook, while customers of Ameren Missouri Company and Fujitsu are the most likely to post about it on Twitter. The companies most likely to receive negatively biased feedback from their customers are Consolidated Edison of NY and Southern California Edison.

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Here’s the first figure in the report:

1502_BadExperiences

Here are some highlights from the report:

  • Nineteen percent of consumers who have interacted with TV service providers and Internet service providers report having a bad experience during the previous six months, the highest levels of any industry. Comcast (25%) and Charter Communications (24%) have the highest levels of consumers reporting bad experiences. The next three companies on the list are Motel 6, Time Warner Cable, and 21st Century insurance (all at 23%).
  • At the other end of the spectrum, only 4% of consumers report having a bad experience with a retailer, and six retailers are at 1%: True Value, Costco, Bed Bath & Beyond, Ace Hardware, Gap, and Staples.
  • The research examines the impact of bad experiences on consumer spending. Fifty-seven percent of consumers who had a bad experience with a fast food chain have decreased their spending with those stores and 32% of consumers who have had a bad experience with a computer company have completely stopped spending with the company. When it comes to health plans and utilities, two industries where consumers have a hard time switching, only 22% of consumers lower their spending after a bad experience.
  • The research shows that companies can increase their revenues when they respond very effectively after a bad experience. The difference in spending between a consumer who experiences a very poor response by a company and one who experiences a very good response is dramatic; the better response leads to 41% fewer consumers decreasing their spending with the company and 31% more increasing their spending.
  • The highest percent of consumers say that investment firms (48%) and major appliance makers (45%) have delivered a good response after a bad experience, while less than 20% of consumers feel that way about TV service providers and Internet service providers.
  • While 32% of consumers told the company about a very bad experience, only 25% shared their very good experiences. The percentage of consumers who communicated after a good experience increased for every channel except telling friends via traditional channels, which stayed even this year.
  • Across all age groups, consumers are most likely to give feedback about bad experiences directly to companies. With good experiences, the same is true with consumers who are at least 45 years old.
  • We examined how many customers of each company had shared negative feedback (to any company) on Facebook over the previous six months. At the top of the list are Advantage Rent A Car, Alabama Power Company, Ameren Illinois Company, AirTram Airways, Audi dealers, Fujitsu, Ameren Missouri Company, and CellularOne.

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The bottom line: Bad experiences are a real problem, especially if you don’t recover well.

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