Nadella Pushes Microsoft to Rediscover Its Soul

In a letter to all Microsoft employees called Starting FY15 – Bold Ambition & Our Core, CEO Satya Nadella established a mandate and vision for significant change across the technology behemoth.

Microsoft has great assets, but it has not kept up with changes in how people use technology. The Redmond giant was becoming increasingly less relevant in a world where digital technology is becoming more relevant.

Microsoft has needed to change for a while. There’s a saying that the best time to plant a tree is ten years ago and the second best time is right now. Nadella has made it clear that Microsoft’s time for change is right now.

My take: First of all, it’s hard to talk about any large-scale culture change without recommending that people review our model called Employee-Engaging Transformation, which is built on five practices: Vision Translation, Persistent LeadershipActivated Middle ManagementGrassroots Mobilization and Captivating Communications.

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We work with many of the world’s leading technology companies, so I could go on and on about what changes are necessary at Microsoft. But I’d rather examine broader lessons from Nadella’s letter. Here are some excerpts that I thought were particularly valuable to discuss:

“...in order to accelerate our innovation, we must rediscover our soul – our unique core

Successful companies almost always start with a strong raison d’être, but it can get lost as the company grows and the world changes (see my post on Starbucks). Without a “soul,” companies drift along as employees across the organization start operating in a disconnected way. This is where the brand comes in. Companies need to constantly refresh their brands and make sure that the brand drives decisions across the organization (see my post on Walmart).

More recently, we have described ourselves as a “devices and services” company. .. At our core, Microsoft is the productivity and platform company for the mobile-first and cloud-first world. We will reinvent productivity to empower every person and every organization on the planet to do more and achieve more.”

Our research shows that employees are more productive and engaged when they are inspired by their organization’s mission. Which one of these statements do you think is more inspiring: “We are the devices and service company” or “We will reinvent productivity to empower every person and every organization on the planet to do more and achieve more.”

“We will create more natural human-computing interfaces that empower all individuals.”

This is a comment about technology, but its also points to a broader commentary about making things easy to use. We have entered into a world where people have more options, more distraction, and less patience. Every organization needs to relentlessly focus on making their products, services, and processes easier for customers to use.

Obsessing over our customers is everybody’s job. I’m looking to the engineering teams to build the experiences our customers love.

What’s not to love about this excerpt. My customer experience manifesto (and Temkin Group, for that matter) is built on a fundamental belief that sustaining great customer experience is not about applying a veneer, but about building competencies across the entire organization that create great experiences for customers (see our four CX core competencies). Also, it’s interesting that Nadella used the word “love.” Experiences are made up of three component (functional, accessible, and emotional) and our Temkin Experience Ratings show that companies are weakest at driving the emotional component. To get people to “love” your company, I suggest applying what we call People-Centric Experience Design.

“I am committed to making Microsoft the best place for smart, curious, ambitious people to do their best work.”

One of the Six Laws of Customer Experience is that unengaged employees can’t create engaged customers. Any company looking to improve how it interacts with customers almost certainly needs to focus on its employees.

“We will be more effective in predicting and understanding what our customers need and more nimble in adjusting to information we get from the market.”

How companies use customer insights is changing rapidly. Technologies such as text analytics and predictive analytics are helping companies tap into more comprehensive and ongoing insights, rather than relying on periodic customer surveys. Ultimately, companies will need to reinvent their operating frameworks so that they can adjust more frequently to take advantage of these rapidly-flowing insights.

Nothing is off the table in how we think about shifting our culture to deliver on this core strategy.”

This type of statement only works if it’s backed up by clear actions that employees can observe. These “symbols” of change need to be clear departures from how the company operated in the past, and can include reorganizations, firings/hirings/promotions/demotions, killing projects, accelerating projects, etc.). Don’t just say change is coming, demonstrate it (see the 3 characteristics of transformational leaders).

“We must each have the courage to transform as individuals. We must ask ourselves, what idea can I bring to life? What insight can I illuminate? What individual life could I change? What customer can I delight? What new skill could I learn? What team could I help build? What orthodoxy should I question?”

The notion of a personal challenge is a great way to help employees think about how they can be (and must be) a part of the change. But the questions won’t be too powerful if they are just statements in a letter from the CEO. Use these questions as part of discussions across the organization and embed them into leadership training and competency models.

 The bottom line: Change isn’t easy, but Microsoft seems ready to give it a try.

Cloud Computing Leaders: Google, Microsoft, and ACS

The “cloud” is a popular topic in IT circles. So we decided to examine how much it will affect companies and how prepared technology vendors are to satisfy those changing customer demands. During January 2012, we asked 800 IT professionals from companies with at least $500 million in annual revenues two questions about cloud computing:

  • Cloud importance: To what degree will the shift to cloud computing influence your company’s IT strategy over the next three years? (Note: 79% of IT professionals say it will have a significant influence)
  • Cloud capabilities: Given your company’s plans for cloud computing, how would you rate the cloud computing capabilities of the IT vendors that you interact with compared with where they need to be?

To fully understand how prepared tech vendors are to meet their client’s changing IT needs for cloud computing, Temkin Group created the Cloud Readiness Index (CRI), a measure of where vendors are in their cloud capabilities compared with the needs of their customers. The CRI takes the cloud importance results and divides it by the cloud capability results as follows:

Here is the Cloud Readiness Index data for 60 tech vendors. Google, Microsoft’s business applications, and ACS are on top of 15 tech vendors in the “leading” category. At the other end of the spectrum, Autodesk, Check Point, and CGI are on the bottom of 25 tech vendors in the “lagging” category.
You can download the data from this post in an Excel spreadsheet for $195. The file includes detailed data for the Cloud Readiness Index as well as details for Cloud Importance and Cloud Capabilities. The spreadsheet includes the data for the 60 tech vendors listed in this post as well as for 28 other tech vendors with smaller sample sizes.

 The bottom line: Tech vendors need to meet their client’s cloud needs

6 Customer-Centric Lessons From Microsoft And Windows 7

I know; you don’t often see “Microsoft” and “customer-centric” together in the same sentence. 🙂

Let me start with a disclaimer: Microsoft is a very large client of my employer (Forrester Research) and I’ve worked with Microsoft on its customer experience efforts. Hopefully my posts about Microsoft demonstrate that I take a balanced view on the software behemoth, as I do with every company (for example, see Will An Efficient Culture Destroy Microsoft? and Apple Beats Windows In Customer Experience).

I recently had discussions with several Microsoft execs about the company’s customer & partner experience (CPE) and online self-help efforts surrounding Windows 7. Overall, I think they are doing an excellent job re-orienting Microsoft more directly on the needs of customers. In particular, here are six areas that other firms can learn from:

  1. Internalize customer experience. Microsoft’s CPE team has developed programs for driving more customer-centricity across the organization. The efforts which include CPE training for new employees, CPE culture programs, CPE goals for all employees, and executive compensation tied to CPE results.
  2. Infuse customer feedback into the product. Core requirements for Microsoft products now include self-help, self-healing pillars. This ensures that supportability is designed into products from the beginning. In addition, the company actively listened to social media during beta with developers and end users to identify problems and develop fixes.
  3. Make a good first impression. A poor initial experience can set the stage for a very dissatisfied customer. That’s why Microsoft created a cross-functional team to focus more than ever on its “shipping process” for Windows 7. This team looked at all of the areas that needed to be in place for customers to be satisfied when the product shipped. One of the key areas: simplifying the installation and upgrade processes.
  4. Create customer-centric metrics. To get the support organization focused on the right areas, the company uses a “time to happy” metric — which looks at the time it takes for customers to get a problem resolved starting from the moment they have the problem. This is quite different from most companies that try to minimize the time it takes them to respond once customers come to them with the problem.
  5. Accelerate the support process. Microsoft has invested heavily in Windows 7’s support infrastructure, looking at both reactive and proactive support. Some of the key investments include Microsoft Answers (providing answers to natural language questions) and Microsoft Fix It (automated diagnostics and solutions). The company is also embedding support communities into the product and working on search engine optimization to make it easier for customers to find solutions.
  6. Take responsibility for the entire ecosystem. Microsoft tracks the satisfaction of its partners as well as the satisfaction of its partners’ end customers. This allows them to identify areas of improvement across the ecosystem. The company also invested in its Windows Compatibility Center  to identify the apps and hardware that works with Windows 7 and provide access to the latest drivers. In addition, the company is working with OEM partners like Dell to create “solution assets” that cut across software/hardware boundaries. 

This is not an endorsement of Windows 7, since I have not used or evaluated the software. I am, however, impressed by Microsoft’s attempt to shift from an engineering-driven to a customer-centric culture. While this transition won’t happen overnight, Microsoft’s CPE efforts are pushing it in the right direction. If Microsoft stays dedicated to CPE, then I am hopeful that Windows 7 and future products will be easier to use and to maintain.

The bottom line: When it comes to customer experience, Microsoft appears to be heading in the right direction.

Will An Efficient Culture Destroy Microsoft?

I just read an interview of Microsoft’s CEO Steve Ballmer in the New York Times that really caught my eye. Ballmer was asked the following question: “Fill in the blank. You want the culture of your company to be more __________?”

Here was his response:

Efficient. The right word is efficient. That’s the direction that every business leader is steering their corporate culture. Given the current economic climate and the uncertainty about how long the recession will last, this is a time when organizations need to do more with less, Microsoft is no exception…

My take: For Microsoft’s sake, I hope that Ballmer misspoke. For all of our sakes, I hope that he’s wrong.

I can’t imagine how awful it would be to work in a company if its culture was built around efficiency. Don’t get me wrong, I aim to be hyper-efficient. But that’s quite different from defining efficiency as the cornerstone of your corporate culture.

What type of an environment would it be if the most important thing that employees cared about, were measured on, and got promoted for was efficiency? The answer: Horrible.

There’s no doubt that Microsoft, like other companies, needs to do more with less in this economic downturn. But creating a culture focused around efficiency would be one of the worst responses to this environment.

So, as I said, hopefully Ballmer misspoke. If not, I anticipate a very difficult time for Microsoft as it struggles to retain employees (who get burned out) and customers (who want more than efficiency). And we can say goodbye to any innovation in Redmond. That’s just not efficient.

My suggestion to Ballmer: Redirect towards a customer-centric culture.

The bottom line: Efficiency may be a good goal, but it’s a terrible culture.

Microsoft Takes A Giant Leap Into Retail

Microsoft has been contemplating a new frontier…

Retail.

Over the past couple of years, Microsoft has recognized that it needs to take a more active role in the retailing of it’s products. It can no longer leave in-person merchandising and selling to retailers. What’s driving the urgency in Redmond to get into stores?

Apple.

Apple has radically changed the paradigm for retailing in technology. Rather than relying on retailers to deliver in-person experiences, Apple stores have revolutionized both the sales model and the service model for technology retailing.

That’s why it’s no surprise that Microsoft just hired a former Walmart executive to open a chain of retail stores. This effort will report into Kevin Turner, Microsoft’s COO (and a former Walmart executive) who says the aim is to

Transform the PC and Microsoft buying experience at retail by improving the articulation and demonstration of the Microsoft innovation and value proposition so that it’s clear, simple and straightforward for consumers everywhere.

This follows Microsoft’s recent unveiling of its huge Retail Experience Center in Redmond. I actually visted the center last year while doing some work with Microsoft on its retail strategy; it’s quite impressive.

My take: The technology market is maturing. Mainstream consumers are now the largest market; not techies. There’s a broad base of customers who want to buy technology products (PCs, phones, MP3 players, TVs, etc) who don’t understand anything about the underlying technology. So the listing of speeds-and-feeds (along with other technical specs) is an outdated retail marketing approach.

Unfortunately, retailers have not kept up with this shift. If you look at the 25 retailers that we ranked in Forrester’s Customer Experience Index, three of the bottom four were electronics retailers (Best Buy, Circuit City, and Radio Shack). This might also explain why stores like Circuit City and Tweeter are going bankrupt. So manufacturers like Sony, Apple, and now Microsoft are taking a lead in finding the right approach.

Here’s some of the things that mainstream technology users need:

  • Plain language about feature benefits to enable trade-offs (why should I care about 60 HZ or 120 HZ when buying an LCD TV?)
  • Products that are easy to setup and provide very simple interfaces for making common configuration changes
  • Easy-to-use decision making tools for narrowing potential products
  • Human advice (through trained employees and social media forums) for making product decisions
  • Access to help for setup, repair, and usage questions

The bottom line: The electronics retail experience is overdue for a makeover

Report: 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors

1412_TemkinExperienceRatingsTechVendors_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors that rates the customer experience of 62 large tech vendors based on a survey of 802 IT decision makers from large North American firms. Here is the executive summary of the report:

The 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings for Tech Vendors evaluates the customer experience of 62 large technology vendors. We surveyed 800 IT professionals from large companies on the success, effort, and emotion components of their experiences with these IT providers. VMware and Microsoft (for both its servers and business applications divisions) earned the top ratings, but still only ended up on the high end of our “okay” range. At the other end of the spectrum, Wipro and Cognizant were at the bottom of the list, joined by 19 other vendors that also received “very poor” ratings. Our research also shows that the Temkin Experience Ratings are correlated with elements of loyalty, such as repurchasing, forgiveness, trust, and recommendations.

This product has a report (.pdf) and a dataset (.xls). The dataset has the details of the Temkin Experience Ratings (including all three components) for the 62 tech vendors as well as data on each vendor’s likelihood to repurchase, 2014 Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and 2014 Temkin Trust Ratings.

Download for $695, includes report (.pdf) and data file (.xls)
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The Temkin Experience Ratings for Tech Vendors evaluates three areas of customer experience: success (can customers achieve what they want to do), effort (how easy is it for customers to do what they want to do), and emotion (how do customers feel about their interaction). Here are the overall results:

2014TxRforTechVendors_Results

Other highlights from the research:

  • The average rating dropped slightly from 53% in 2013 to 52% in 2014, with the effort component declining the most.
  • VMware is the only firm that placed in the top five for each of the three components of the ratings, and Wipro is the only firm that place in the bottom five for all three components.
  • Report shows a high correlation (R=.8) between the tech vendors’ Temkin Experience Ratings and the likelihood that IT professionals will purchase more products and services from them.
  • Companies in the upper quartile of the 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings for Tech Vendors have a 15-point advantage over those in the bottom quartile in the percentage of clients who are likely to repurchase.
  • Vendors in the upper quartile of the ratings have an average Net Promoter® Score more than 24-points higher than those in the bottom quartile.

This product has a report (.pdf) and a dataset (excel). The dataset has the details of the Temkin Experience Ratings, including all three components, for the 62 tech vendors as well as data on each vendor’s likelihood to repurchase, 2014 Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and 2014 Temkin Trust Ratings. [Download sample of data file (.xls)]

Download for $695, includes report (.pdf) and data file (.xls)
BuyDownload3

The bottom line: Tech vendors need to improve their customer experience.

Report: Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2014

1407_IT_NPSBenchmark_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2014, The research examines Net Promoter Scores and the link to loyalty for 63 tech vendors based on feedback from IT decision makers. We also compared overall results to our 2013 NPS benchmark and our 2012 NPS benchmark. Here’s the executive summary:

We surveyed IT decision-makers from more than 800 large North American firms to learn about their relationships with their tech vendors. We asked them a series of questions regarding their experiences as the clients of different tech vendors, and one of the questions we posed generated Net Promoter Scores® (NPS®) for the companies. Of the 63 companies we looked at, EDS and VMware earned the highest NPS, while Autodesk and Cognizant received the lowest. The overall industry average NPS dropped for the second year in a row. Our analysis also delved into the correlation between NPS and loyalty, revealing that, compared to severe detractors, promoters are much more likely to spend more money with their tech vendors in 2014, try new products and services when they are announced, and forgive the vendor for a mistake. We compared the loyalty levels for each vendor, and we found that SunGard and IBM software have the most customers planning on increasing their purchases in 2014, while Satyam and EDS customers are the most willing to try new offerings, and Satyam has the most forgiving customers. Our research also shows that promoters are more concerned than detractors about getting lower prices.

Download report for $695 (includes Excel spreadsheet with data)
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This is the third year that Temkin Group has completed the NPS study. Over that time, the average NPS in the tech industry has been dropping. NPS in for tech vendors was 33.6 in 2012 and 24.7 in 2013, falling to 23.1 in 2014.

With an NPS of 48, EDS came out with the top score followed closely by VMware with 45. Six other tech vendors received NPS of 35 or more: EMC, Microsoft servers, Oracle outsourcing, Pitney Bowes, Microsoft business applications, and Cisco.

At the other end of the spectrum, three tech vendors have negative NPS: Autodesk, Cognizant, and Wipro. Six other vendors fell below 10: Capgemini, Intuit, ADP outsourcing, CA, Infosys, and HP outsourcing.

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The report also examines the link between NPS and loyalty. Our analysis shows that promoters are more than six times likely to forgive a tech vendor if they deliver a bad experience, about seven times as likely to try a new offering from the company, and almost three times as likely to purchase more from them in 2014 than they did in 2013.

In addition to benchmarking NPS, the research measures the loyalty that large companies have for their tech vendors. Respondents have the most plans to increase spending with SunGard, IBM software, Alcatel-Lucent, and ACS. They are most likely to try new offerings from Satyam, EDS, and EMC. And if the tech vendors make a mistake, IT decision makers are most likely to forgive Satyam, EDS, Ericsson, and Alcatel-Lucent. NPS characterizes respondents as Promoters when they are very likely to recommend and Detractors when they are very unlikely to recommend.

Report details: The report includes graphics with data for NPS, 2014 purchase intentions, likelihood to forgive, likelihood to try a new offering, and areas of improvement for the 63 tech vendors that had at least 40 pieces of feedback. The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 63 companies as well as for 22 other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2013. If you want to know more about the data file, download this excel spreadsheet without the data.

Download report for $695 (includes Excel spreadsheet with data)
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The bottom line: When it comes to NPS, large tech vendors are heading in the wrong direction

Note: See our 2013 NPS benchmark and 2012 NPS benchmark for tech vendors as well as our page full of NPS resources.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Amazon Provides Best Technical Support

We examined the service and support delivered by the following technology providers:

  • Amazon (e.g., Kindle, Kindle Fire, Kindle Fire HD, Amazon Prime)
  • Apple (e.g., iPhone, iPad, iTunes, iCloud, MacBook)
  • Google (e.g., Search, Google Docs, Gmail, YouTube, Google Play, Google Drive)
  • Sony (e.g., PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4)
  • Microsoft (e.g., XBOX, WINDOWS, MSOffice, and Skype)
  • Nintendo (e.g., Wii, Wii U)
  • Samsung (e.g., Galaxy Phones, Galaxy Tablets, Galaxy Note)

We asked consumers who had recent service or support experience to rate those vendors in two areas:

  1. Thinking about your recent customer service or technical support experience from these companies, how would you rate the end-to-end experience from your first attempt to get help until your issue was resolved?
  2. How would you rate the overall quality of online resources provided by these companies for end user support (e.g., websites, chat, contact us, FAQs)?

As you can see in the graphic below, less than half of consumers rated any of the companies “excellent.” Some other tidbits:

  • Amazon.com is on top for end-to-end service as well as for its online resources.
  • Apple provides the second best end-to-end service, but the worst online resources.
  • Google is next to the bottom in both categories.
  • Microsoft is the lowest scoring for end-to-end service, but third from the bottom for its online resources.

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The bottom line: Consumers could use better support for their technology.

2014 Temkin Group CX Vendor Excellence Award Winners

Watch this blog and my Twitter feed for an announcement about the 2015 CX Vendor Excellence Awards in January


CEVendorAward_logoToday we announced the results of the 2014 Temkin Group CX Vendor Excellence Awards. Once again we had a great group of nominees, making the scoring difficult for the judges. Congratulations to this year’s winners:

Allegiance

Clarabridge

Verint

Also, congratulations to the finalists: Confirmit, Enghouse Interactive, Mindshare Technologies, Qualtrics, and Walker.

In its second year, these awards recognize companies that provide products and services that help companies improve the customer experience they deliver. Nominees are rated based on their capabilities, results, and client feedback.

The CxVE Awards were judged by five noted customer experience experts: Mila D’Antonio (Editor-in-Chief at 1to1 Media), Denise Bahil (CX Transformist at Temkin Group), Desirree Madison-Biggs (Director of Customer Experience Insights & Advocacy at Symantec), Rick Meyreles (VP – Global Voice of Customer, World Service at American Express), and Bruce Temkin (Managing Partner & CX Transformist at Temkin Group).

I’ve included the first two section of the nomination forms submitted by the eight winners and finalists. Read more of this post

AOL Leads Internet Services Industry in 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings

We recently released the 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings that ranks the customer experience of 268 companies across 19 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

AOL is the highest-rated Internet service provider for the second year in a row, landing in 136th place overall with a rating of 65%. EarthLink came in a very close second with a rating of 64% and a rank of 144th after being near the bottom of the list for the past two years.

Download entire dataset for $395

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Here are some additional findings from the Internet services industry: Read more of this post

Symantec and Apple Lead Software Industry in 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings

We recently released the 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings that ranks the customer experience of 268 companies across 19 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Symantec took the top spot for the first time ever, earning a 69% rating and landing in 102nd place overall out of 268 companies across 19 industries. Apple came in a very close second with a rating of 68% and an overall rank of 109th. While Symantec ascended from its 2013 position in the middle of the group, Apple maintained its second-place rank from last year. Meanwhile, at the bottom of the list, Blackboard’s ranking dropped dramatically, leaving it in last place with a rating of 54% and an overall ranking of 241st.

Download entire dataset for $395

SOftwareA
Here are some additional findings from the software industry: Read more of this post

50 CX Tips: eBook and Infographic

1310_50CXTips_COVERI recently completed a series of 50 customer experience (CX) tips. To make it easier for people to read and download all of the tips, I assembled them into a free eBook: 50 CX Tips: Simple Ideas, Powerful Results.

Each of the 50 CX Tips is aligned with one or more of Temkin Group’s four customer experience core competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness.

The CX Tips include examples from a wide variety of companies including Adobe, Amazon.com, Apple, BCBS of Michigan, Becker and Poliakoff, Big Lots, BMO Financial Group, Bombardier Aerospace, CDW, Charles Schwab, Citrix, Disney, EMC, Fidelity Investments, Hampton Inn, Hilton, IBM, Intersil, Intuit, JetBlue, Microsoft, Oklahoma City Thunder, Oracle, Safelite AutoGlass, Salesforce.com, SanDIsk, SimplexGrinnell, Southwest Airlines, Sovereign Assurance of NZ, Sprint, Starbucks, Stream Global Services, Sam’s Club, USAA, VMware, and ZocDoc.

While you may have a hard time applying all 50 CX TIps, you should be able to identify several that will work for your organization. I challenge you to select three or more of the CX Tips to implement. Here’s an idea: Have each of your team members pick the five CX Tips that they think would be the most powerful for your organization. Use a team meeting to discuss everyone’s selections and pick the ones you want to implement.

We also created an infographic with the 50 CX tips. Here’s a version with the top 10 CX tips (click on the graphic to get a .pdf of the full infographic).

Top10CXTips_TemkinGroupThe bottom line: A handful of CX Tips can propel your customer experience.

CX Tip #24: Define Competencies for Living the Brand

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CX Tip #24: Define Competencies for Living the Brand
(Compelling Brand Values)

Microsoft defined six values to support its corporate mission: To enable people and businesses throughout the world to realize their full potential Of the values created towards this mission, a Passion for Customers, Partners, and Technology. To foster its values, Microsoft has developed a set of key competencies (core, leadership & profession specific) that every employee is measured against in terms of their proficiency in demonstrated behaviors. The competencies help to plan careers, build necessary capabilities for success in a role, and inform performance reviews. “Customer Focus” is core competency for all employees, measured on a 5 point proficiency scale. Click for more info

See full list of CX Tips

Tech Vendors: Benchmarking Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients, 2013

1309_ITProuctsAndRelationships_COVERWe just published a new Temkin Group data snapshot: Tech Vendors: Benchmarking Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients. This new research highlights how IT professionals rate tech vendors in two key areas of experience: Products and relationships.

During Q1, 802 IT professionals from companies with at least $500 million in annual revenues rated both the products of and their relationships with 54 tech vendors. Some of the findings include: VMware leads in six of the eight satisfaction categories—product quality, product flexibility, technical support, account team support, cost of ownership, and innovation—while Microsoft servers and IBM SPSS score highest in product features, and Apple and Microsoft desktop software lead in ease of use. Deloitte Consulting on the other hand scores last in every satisfaction category except ease of use, which Computer Sciences Corporation IT services received bottom marks in.

Download report for $495
(includes spreadsheet with data)

As you can see below, we found a wide range of ratings across the 54 tech vendors for each of the eight criteria we examined:

ProductsRelationshipsAverages

Note: IT decision makers were asked to evaluate each of the criteria on a scale from very poor (1) to excellent (7). Net satisfaction equals the percentage of 6s and 7s minus the percentage of 1s, 2s, and 3s.

The data snapshot includes eight graphics that show the scores for each of the 54 tech vendors for each of these criteria. Here are the average net scores across all of the criteria:

ProductsRelationshipsCompanies

Download report for $495
(includes spreadsheet with data)

The bottom line: Tech vendors need to improve their products and relationships

CX Tip #42: Make it Easy for Employees to Be Brand Advocates

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CX Tip #42: Make it Easy for Employees to Be Brand Advocates
(Customer Connectedness, Employee Engagement)

Microsoft’s Quick Assistance program is used when employees encounter consumers in social situations (e.g., meeting someone on a flight). The program positions employees as ambassadors and allows them to provide no-charge technical support incident vouchers to customers. Employees are able to request and deliver vouchers directly from their mobile phone.

See full list of CX Tips

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