The Experience Of A Bicycle Built By You

The Tour de France just ended and the Pan Mass Challenge, a huge event where people raise money for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute by biking across Massachusetts, was held this past weekend. So biking is in the air.

That’s probably why an email from Peter Merholz, President of Adaptive Path,  caught my eye. He sent me a link to a blog post about work that his firm is doing with a bike store in San Francisco. It turns out that Mission Bicycle Company was selling fixed gear bikes online, but decided to open a retail store where customers could easily assemble their own custom bikes.

But “easily” is not something that’s easy to accomplish — especially when Adaptive Path had less than 2 weeks to design the in-store experience.

Despite a HEAVILY time-constrained project, Adaptive Path followed a user-centric approach:

  • Interviewing cyclists to understand their needs and expectations of a custom bike retail experience
  • Clearly articulating the Mission Bikes process in a way that aligned with cyclists’ needs and expectations
  • Sketching and generating experience concepts quickly
  • Prototyping the experience design concepts in their studio

The final store design (which is very cool) was based on 4 components: Instructions, Wall Mount Displays, Table Displays, and Build Kits. ap_mb_system1-1023x514

Here’s what Zack Rosen, CEO of Mission Bicycle Company, told me about his new bicycle shop:

The visceral experience of being in our store surrounded by beautiful bicycles and parts laid out like artwork was what made the sales system and process work. If our customers are excited by the prospects of designing a custom bicycle they will happily go through the process Adaptive Path careful designed.

It’s worth taking a look at the case study they pulled together on the effort. It shows the evolution from sketches, to designs, to implementations. For example, this is how the Table Display evolved:

MissionBikeTableDisplay

The bottom line: There’s always time for good user-centric design

About Bruce Temkin, CCXP
I'm an experience (XM) management catalyst; helping organizations improve results by engaging the hearts and minds of their employees, customers, and partners. I enjoy researching and speaking about these topics. I lead the Qualtrics XM Institute, which is the world's best job. We're igniting a global community of XM Professionals who are inspired and empowered to radically improve the human experience. To achieve this goal, my team focuses on thought leadership, training, and community building. My work is driven by a set of fundamental beliefs: 1) Everything starts and ends with human beings, so you need to understand how people think, feel, and behave; 2) XM is a discipline that needs to be woven throughout an organization's entire operating fabric; and 3) Building the XM discipline requires a combination of culture, competency, and technology.

One Response to The Experience Of A Bicycle Built By You

  1. Stpehen Reinach says:

    Great post, Bruce. Very cool case study by AP. Shows the power of low-fidelity prototying and sketching. Thanks for sharing!

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