Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2014

1410_NPSBenchmarkStudy_COVERWe published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2014. This is the third year of this study that includes Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®) on 283 companies across 20 industries based on a study of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here’s the executive summary:

We measured the Net Promoter Score of 283 companies across 20 industries. USAA and JetBlue took the top two spots, each with an NPS of more than 60. USAA’s banking, credit card, and insurance businesses outpaced their industries’ averages by more than any other company. At the bottom of the list, HSBC and Citibank received the two lowest scores, and Super 8 and Motel 6 fell the farthest below their industry averages. On an industry level, auto dealers earned the highest average NPS, while TV service providers earned the lowest. Eleven of the 19 industries increased their average NPS from last year, with car rentals and credit cards enjoying the biggest score boosts. Out of all the companies, US Airways and Highmark BCBS improved the most, while Quality Inn and Baskin-Robbins declined the most. For most industries, the average NPS is highest with older consumers and is lowest with younger consumers. Investment firms have the largest generation gap.

Here’s a list of companies included in this study (.pdf).

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Here are the NPS scores across 20 industries:

1410_industryNPS

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If you want to know what data is included in this report and dataset, download this sample Excel dataset file.Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 4.05.17 PM

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: State of VoC Programs, 2014

1410_StateOfVoC2014_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2014. Based on data from 218 large organizations with at least $500 million in annual revenues, we examined VoC efforts within large organizations. The report includes a self-assessment and data to benchmark your VoC program. Here’s the executive summary:

For the fourth straight year, Temkin Group has benchmarked the maturity of voice of the customer (VoC) programs within large organizations. Despite a slight drop in staffing numbers and executive involvement, companies’ VoC efforts continue to deliver successful results. While companies today are investing more money into most VoC solutions, spending on text analytics and predictive analytics has increased the most dramatically over the past year. Looking ahead, companies plan on focusing less on multiple-choice surveys and more on interaction history and predictive analytics. In terms of metrics, our analysis shows that satisfaction and Net Promoter Score work most successfully at the relationship level, whereas Customer Effort Score works most successfully at the transactional level. Respondents also completed Temkin Group’s VoC Competency and Maturity Assessment, which examines capabilities across what we call the “6 Ds”: Detect, Disseminate, Diagnose, Discuss, Design, and Deploy. Only 11% of companies have reached the two highest levels of VoC maturity, a drop-off from last year. When we compared high scoring VoC programs with lower scoring programs, we found that companies with more mature programs have better overall business performance, spend more on analytics, are more active on mobile, employ more full-time employees, take more action with the insights, and enjoy more executive support.

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Here are results from companies that completed Temkin Group’s VoC Competency and Maturity Assessment (one of the 25 figures in the report):

1410_StateOfVoCMaturity

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The bottom line: VoC programs have a lot of maturing to do

Lesson From Dana-Farber: Treat The Whole Person

As part of yesterday’s Customer Experience Day celebration, I attended a CXPA local networking event at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) in Boston. The session kicked off with a panel from the DFCI discussing patient experience.

I’m a big fan of DFCI and have enormous respect for the great work that it does in battling cancer. The panel, which included a cancer survivor turned volunteer, was fantastic. I was inspired by the commitment and compassion they displayed.

One of the points that came up was DFCI’s commitment to treat the whole person. This explains why it provides things such as hand massages during chemotherapy treatment. DFCI doesn’t just treat the disease, it treats the whole person.

I love the concept of the whole person. It’s not just applicable to DFCI or other health care providers, but to every organization. It’s a powerful concept for anyone who cares about customer experience.

Here’s how I think about the whole person:

  • Emotion, not just success. DFCI doesn’t have data showing that hand massages will result in better clinical outcomes. It knows that a patient’s positive medical outcome is important, but it’s not enough. Your customers are the same. You need to understand, care about, and actively design for your customers’ emotional states.
  • Goals, not just interactions. A chemotherapy patient is battling cancer, not just getting treatment. When customers interact with you, it’s often part of a broader goal. A customer who calls to change her address, for instance, probably has a life change going on that dwarfs the need to update your administrative systems. The better you can understand and cater to these larger goals, the more opportunity you will have to build loyalty.
  • Community, not just individuals. One of DFCI’s key elements for helping patients is supporting their caregivers. These people are a critical element of the patient’s medical journey. Your organization needs to understand the role that community plays in your customers’ lives. How can you help your customers achieve their goals by supporting key members in their personal ecosystems?
  • Caring, not just doing. DFCI doesn’t just mandate a set of explicit activities that define how people should focus on the whole person, it consistently reinforces the importance of this focus in achieving DFCI’s mission. It gets employees and volunteers to care about these elements, not just follow a bunch of directions. You need to help employees understand why the whole person is important, and spark their natural capabilities for caring.

I hope that you are inspired to drive your organization towards focusing on the whole person. Here are a few tools that should help:

The bottom line: Start focusing on the whole person!

Report: Case Studies in Text Analytics

1405_TextAnalyticsCaseStudies_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Case Studies in Text Analytics. The research provides rich details about how five leading companies—American Express, ADP, Firstsource, Safelite AutoGlass, and Verizon—are using text analytics. Here’s the executive summary:

To help organizations understand how to use text analytics to transform their VoC programs, we have compiled five case studies from companies that have successfully utilized this capability. This report offers insights into their efforts, describing how Safelite drives value with a small team, how Firstsource ventures beyond service quality and training, how American Express built a custom solution in-house, how ADP scaled with a distributed model, and how Verizon scaled with a centralized model. Each of these case studies follows a company’s journey as it built out its text analytics capabilities and also shows how each one organized its efforts. In addition to the case studies, we also outline five key decisions that every text analytics program must make.

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You may also want to see the report Text Analytics Reshapes VoC Programs.

The report provides rich details on how the companies have deployed text analytics. They have each used it in quite different ways. Here’s a summary of how they’ve successfully used text analytics across what we call the 6 D’s of of a Voice of the Customer Program:

TextAnalyticsBPs

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The bottom line: Learn how leaders are using text analytics

Seven Stages to a Data-Centric Mindset

Analysts who work with customer data are often frustrated by the slow uptake in its usage. They see a ton of valuable insights in their work that go to waste. They’re frustrated that business partners aren’t lining up for as much of this insight as they can possibly consume. What’s going on?

Are analysts unjustifiably bullish about their content? Are business people just anti-data?

No! (at least most of the time)

People are creatures of habit, so most changes are not instantaneous. Adopting something new is a process, not an event. To understand how to encourage business people to use more data insights, it’s helpful look at their path to adoption. That’s why I created what I’m calling the “Seven Stages to a Data-Centric Mindset.”

7StagesOfDataCantricMindset

Here are some tactics that analysts can use with their business partners at different stages of building a data-centric mindset:

  • Stage 1: Resist: Try and understand the personal and professional goals of the individual business partners. Use that knowledge to discuss the value of the insights in terms of how it will help him/her achieve those SPECIFIC goals. As much as possible, use his/her language for metrics, measurement and objectives.
  • Stage 2: Consider: Show the business partner the data in different ways, trying to see how he/she may be able to use it. Do not assume that any existing reports or formats are the right ones. Look for what resonates with him/her and customize the data in those areas. Your effort in this stage is like helping someone find the right shoes in a shoe store. You’ll need to cater your pitch to tastes and desires that you may not have anticipated.
  • Stage 3: Request: Once the business partner is in this stage, you’re on the hook. You will need to quickly respond to their needs. They have interest in using the data, but can easily slip back if they feel as though you are unable to support their needs.
  • Stage 4: Incorporate: Keep in touch with your business partners and look at how they are using the information. They may have some modifications that they need, but more importantly they will help you identify new ways that you can add value across the organization with your analysis.
  • Stage 5: Envision: This is an exciting stage as business partners are really using the data insights. But they may create demands that are beyond your current capabilities or resources. Make sure to be a part of this process, but also manage the expectations about what your group is able to provide. This is also a place where you might want the business partner to fund new development.
  • Stage 6: Demand: In this stage, business partners will likely need dedicated support as data insights are becoming a fundamental component of their operations. Make the case that they might need more headcount intheir organization to support this “great” increasing use of the insights.
  • Stage 7: Embrace. Yay! Your business partners have achieved the final stage of developing a data-centric mindset. Use them to help “sell” the value of using your insights across other parts of the business.

The bottom line: Help your business partners develop a customer-centric mindset

Report: Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2014

1407_IT_NPSBenchmark_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2014, The research examines Net Promoter Scores and the link to loyalty for 63 tech vendors based on feedback from IT decision makers. We also compared overall results to our 2013 NPS benchmark and our 2012 NPS benchmark. Here’s the executive summary:

We surveyed IT decision-makers from more than 800 large North American firms to learn about their relationships with their tech vendors. We asked them a series of questions regarding their experiences as the clients of different tech vendors, and one of the questions we posed generated Net Promoter Scores® (NPS®) for the companies. Of the 63 companies we looked at, EDS and VMware earned the highest NPS, while Autodesk and Cognizant received the lowest. The overall industry average NPS dropped for the second year in a row. Our analysis also delved into the correlation between NPS and loyalty, revealing that, compared to severe detractors, promoters are much more likely to spend more money with their tech vendors in 2014, try new products and services when they are announced, and forgive the vendor for a mistake. We compared the loyalty levels for each vendor, and we found that SunGard and IBM software have the most customers planning on increasing their purchases in 2014, while Satyam and EDS customers are the most willing to try new offerings, and Satyam has the most forgiving customers. Our research also shows that promoters are more concerned than detractors about getting lower prices.

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This is the third year that Temkin Group has completed the NPS study. Over that time, the average NPS in the tech industry has been dropping. NPS in for tech vendors was 33.6 in 2012 and 24.7 in 2013, falling to 23.1 in 2014.

With an NPS of 48, EDS came out with the top score followed closely by VMware with 45. Six other tech vendors received NPS of 35 or more: EMC, Microsoft servers, Oracle outsourcing, Pitney Bowes, Microsoft business applications, and Cisco.

At the other end of the spectrum, three tech vendors have negative NPS: Autodesk, Cognizant, and Wipro. Six other vendors fell below 10: Capgemini, Intuit, ADP outsourcing, CA, Infosys, and HP outsourcing.

1407_ITNPS_Companies

The report also examines the link between NPS and loyalty. Our analysis shows that promoters are more than six times likely to forgive a tech vendor if they deliver a bad experience, about seven times as likely to try a new offering from the company, and almost three times as likely to purchase more from them in 2014 than they did in 2013.

In addition to benchmarking NPS, the research measures the loyalty that large companies have for their tech vendors. Respondents have the most plans to increase spending with SunGard, IBM software, Alcatel-Lucent, and ACS. They are most likely to try new offerings from Satyam, EDS, and EMC. And if the tech vendors make a mistake, IT decision makers are most likely to forgive Satyam, EDS, Ericsson, and Alcatel-Lucent. NPS characterizes respondents as Promoters when they are very likely to recommend and Detractors when they are very unlikely to recommend.

Report details: The report includes graphics with data for NPS, 2014 purchase intentions, likelihood to forgive, likelihood to try a new offering, and areas of improvement for the 63 tech vendors that had at least 40 pieces of feedback. The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 63 companies as well as for 22 other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2013. If you want to know more about the data file, download this excel spreadsheet without the data.

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The bottom line: When it comes to NPS, large tech vendors are heading in the wrong direction

Note: See our 2013 NPS benchmark and 2012 NPS benchmark for tech vendors as well as our page full of NPS resources.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

5 Rules To Stop Employees From Gaming Your Feedback System

When an employee asks a customer to “give me a 10 on a survey or I’ll get fired,” can you really count on the accuracy of that customer’s rating? This may be an extreme example of “gaming feedback,” but many versions of this behavior occur all the time.

To keep gaming feedback in check, it’s important to be explicit with employees about what the company considers to be unacceptable behaviors. Here are five rules that you should strictly enforce with employees:

  1. Don’t mention or refer to a score. You can not ask a customer to give you a score or mention any possible option on the survey.
    • Example of bad behavior: “Let me know if you can’t give me an excellent on any of the questions.”
  2. Don’t mention specific survey questions. You can not tell a customer about a specific question that they will be asked as part of the survey.
    • Example of bad behavior: “You will be asked to rate me on my knowledge.”
  3. Don’t mention any consequences. You can’t tell a customer about the positive or negative consequences that you or the organization will have based on the feedback that the customer gives.
    • Example of bad behavior: “If you give us a low score, then we will not make our bonus.”
  4. Don’t say or imply that you will see their responses. You can’t let the customer know that you will see the specific information that they put in their feedback.
    • Example of bad behavior: “I look forward to reading your responses.”
  5. Don’t intimidate customers in any way. Any attempt to affect how customers will respond in their feedback, or keep them from completing the survey, whether implicitly or explicitly, is not allowed.
    • Example of bad behavior: “Let’s grab a Cubs game after you fill out the survey.”
    • Example of bad behavior: “Don’t bother filling out the survey, the company doesn’t look at them.”

Of course, keeping this bad behavior in check also requires the company to behave appropriately. The biggest mistake I see is tying too much compensation to a score. When you heavily incent a specific metric, employees will do whatever it takes to improve that metric,  including “gaming” the system. Think about it, the heavier the compensation, the more you are implicitly asking the employee to improve the score at any cost (see why Staples employees stopped selling computers).

So make sure that your incentives are focused on driving the behaviors that you want from employees, not specific outcomes like scores.

The bottom line: Use feedback primarily to improve, not to keep score.

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