Nadella Pushes Microsoft to Rediscover Its Soul

In a letter to all Microsoft employees called Starting FY15 – Bold Ambition & Our Core, CEO Satya Nadella established a mandate and vision for significant change across the technology behemoth.

Microsoft has great assets, but it has not kept up with changes in how people use technology. The Redmond giant was becoming increasingly less relevant in a world where digital technology is becoming more relevant.

Microsoft has needed to change for a while. There’s a saying that the best time to plant a tree is ten years ago and the second best time is right now. Nadella has made it clear that Microsoft’s time for change is right now.

My take: First of all, it’s hard to talk about any large-scale culture change without recommending that people review our model called Employee-Engaging Transformation, which is built on five practices: Vision Translation, Persistent LeadershipActivated Middle ManagementGrassroots Mobilization and Captivating Communications.

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We work with many of the world’s leading technology companies, so I could go on and on about what changes are necessary at Microsoft. But I’d rather examine broader lessons from Nadella’s letter. Here are some excerpts that I thought were particularly valuable to discuss:

“...in order to accelerate our innovation, we must rediscover our soul – our unique core

Successful companies almost always start with a strong raison d’être, but it can get lost as the company grows and the world changes (see my post on Starbucks). Without a “soul,” companies drift along as employees across the organization start operating in a disconnected way. This is where the brand comes in. Companies need to constantly refresh their brands and make sure that the brand drives decisions across the organization (see my post on Walmart).

More recently, we have described ourselves as a “devices and services” company. .. At our core, Microsoft is the productivity and platform company for the mobile-first and cloud-first world. We will reinvent productivity to empower every person and every organization on the planet to do more and achieve more.”

Our research shows that employees are more productive and engaged when they are inspired by their organization’s mission. Which one of these statements do you think is more inspiring: “We are the devices and service company” or “We will reinvent productivity to empower every person and every organization on the planet to do more and achieve more.”

“We will create more natural human-computing interfaces that empower all individuals.”

This is a comment about technology, but its also points to a broader commentary about making things easy to use. We have entered into a world where people have more options, more distraction, and less patience. Every organization needs to relentlessly focus on making their products, services, and processes easier for customers to use.

Obsessing over our customers is everybody’s job. I’m looking to the engineering teams to build the experiences our customers love.

What’s not to love about this excerpt. My customer experience manifesto (and Temkin Group, for that matter) is built on a fundamental belief that sustaining great customer experience is not about applying a veneer, but about building competencies across the entire organization that create great experiences for customers (see our four CX core competencies). Also, it’s interesting that Nadella used the word “love.” Experiences are made up of three component (functional, accessible, and emotional) and our Temkin Experience Ratings show that companies are weakest at driving the emotional component. To get people to “love” your company, I suggest applying what we call People-Centric Experience Design.

“I am committed to making Microsoft the best place for smart, curious, ambitious people to do their best work.”

One of the Six Laws of Customer Experience is that unengaged employees can’t create engaged customers. Any company looking to improve how it interacts with customers almost certainly needs to focus on its employees.

“We will be more effective in predicting and understanding what our customers need and more nimble in adjusting to information we get from the market.”

How companies use customer insights is changing rapidly. Technologies such as text analytics and predictive analytics are helping companies tap into more comprehensive and ongoing insights, rather than relying on periodic customer surveys. Ultimately, companies will need to reinvent their operating frameworks so that they can adjust more frequently to take advantage of these rapidly-flowing insights.

Nothing is off the table in how we think about shifting our culture to deliver on this core strategy.”

This type of statement only works if it’s backed up by clear actions that employees can observe. These “symbols” of change need to be clear departures from how the company operated in the past, and can include reorganizations, firings/hirings/promotions/demotions, killing projects, accelerating projects, etc.). Don’t just say change is coming, demonstrate it (see the 3 characteristics of transformational leaders).

“We must each have the courage to transform as individuals. We must ask ourselves, what idea can I bring to life? What insight can I illuminate? What individual life could I change? What customer can I delight? What new skill could I learn? What team could I help build? What orthodoxy should I question?”

The notion of a personal challenge is a great way to help employees think about how they can be (and must be) a part of the change. But the questions won’t be too powerful if they are just statements in a letter from the CEO. Use these questions as part of discussions across the organization and embed them into leadership training and competency models.

 The bottom line: Change isn’t easy, but Microsoft seems ready to give it a try.

Report: The State of Customer Experience Management, 2014

1404_TheStateOfCX2014_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Management, 2014. It examines the CX efforts within more than 200 large companies. Here’s the executive summary:

We surveyed more than 200 large companies and found an abundance of Customer Experience (CX) ambition and activity. Most companies have a CX executive leading the charge, a central team coordinating significant CX activities, and a staff of six to 10 full-time CX professionals. Using Temkin Group’s CX competency assessment, we found that only 10% of companies have reached the highest two levels of customer experience, although this does represent a slight increase from last year. Most firms struggle most to master Employee Engagement and Compelling Brand Values. When compared with CX laggards, CX leaders have stronger financial results, enjoy better CX leadership, and implement more successful employee engagement efforts. Executives in companies with stronger CX competencies also tend to focus more on delighting customers and less on cutting costs.

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The percentage of large organizations that have reached the two highest levels of customer experience maturity has grown from 6% in 2013 to 10% this year. During the same period, the percentage of companies in the lowest level of maturity has dropped from 40% to 31%.

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Here are some additional findings from the research:

  • Companies with good or very good ratings in Purposeful Leadership rose from 39% to 45%, the largest improvement for any customer experience competency.
  • The research also revealed a significant focus on improvement. While only 6% of companies believe that their organization currently delivers industry-leading customer experience, 58% have a goal to be an industry-leader within three years.
  • Sixty-five percent of companies have a senior executive in charge of customer experience.
  • More than half of companies have at least six full-time customer experience professionals.
  • Almost two-thirds of respondents rate customer experience with phone agent as good or very good, the highest rated interaction. Less than 30% rate mobile phone and cross-channel experiences at that level.
  • The top obstacle to customer experience is the same as it has been for four years, “other competing priorities.”
  • We compared companies that have strong customer experience maturity with those that are weaker and found that customer experience leaders have better financial results, have more senior executive commitment, and focus more on their organization’s culture.

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The bottom line: Most companies are in early stages of CX maturity, but are getting better

United Airlines Can’t Advertise Its Way To Flyer-Friendly

United Airlines recently announced that its new brand campaign will resurrect its iconic tagline “Fly the Friendly Skies.” According to the United Airlines press release, “”Flyer-friendly” is “user-friendly” for today’s customers.” Tom O’Toole, United’s senior vice president of marketing and loyalty, says, “Our new brand campaign expresses the customer focus of all of United’s investments.” As Jane Levere points out in her NY Times article, “United is now telling travelers it is everything from “legroom friendly” and “online friendly” to “shut-eye friendly” and “EWR friendly.”

My take: Let’s start with some basic facts. United Airlines received a “poor” rating in the 2013 Temkin Experience Ratings. Its ratings are in the lower half of the airline industry, and the company showed no improvement over 2012.

In the 2013 Temkin Customer Service Ratings, United Airlines was in next-to-last place out of nine U.S. airlines (US Airways is the worst). United Airlines ranked 216th out of all 235 companies in the ratings.

Does that sound “flyer-friendly?” United Airlines will have a hard time backing up that claim today.

No matter how much companies spend on advertising, they can’t convince customers that they deliver a good experience — unless they really do. In the past, I’ve chided Comcast, JP Morgan ChaseCircuit City, and John Hancock for pushing these empty promises.

The path to being seen as flyer-friendly requires the organization to commit to delivering on that promise. I’ve highlighted a few good examples in previous posts: Alaska Airlines engaged its employees with its North of Expected campaign, Ford engaged its employees with its Drive One campaign, Staples redesigned customer interactions as part of its That Was Easy campaign, and JetBlue embedded its value across touchpoints in its Happy Jetting campaign.

My advice to United Airlines it to follow these CX Tips:

The bottom line: Don’t proclaim your flyer-friendliness, become flyer-friendly and then tell people about it

CX Tip #3: Regularly Refresh Your Brand Promises

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CX Tip #3: Regularly Refresh Your Brand Promises
(Compelling Brand Values)

Starbucks CEO Howard Shultz once said “Customers must recognize that you stand for something.” While most organizations start with a clear brand promise, the focus on short term goals can easily push them away from delivering on it. Decisions across an organization may seem reasonable in their immediate context, but they can collectively push a company off its course.

Once the brand promise is lost, organizations will often spiral out of control without the brand as their True North guiding the way. That’s what happened to Starbucks in 2007. Shultz returned to the company in early 2008 to help restore the brand promise. His assessment of the situation: “We lost our way.” The company closed more than 7,000 stores on one day for a three-hour session to re-instill the brand promise with employees.

Rather than waiting for the painful recognition that your organization has lost its way, examine your brand promise at least every two years. Even if nothing changes, the process of reaffirming your brand can be powerful. Make sure that your brand promises are recognizable, believable, compelling, and well understood by both customers and employees.

See full list of CX Tips

CX Tip #8: Start Your Brand Marketing Internally

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CX Tip #8: Start Your Brand Marketing Internally
(Compelling Brand Values)

Brands need to be understood and “owned” by the entire organization. That’s why it’s critical for companies to invest heavily in communicating the brand value to everyone in the company. Before BMO Financial Group’s new brand went live, it launched an internal campaign, Brilliant at the Basics, which identified eight actions that every employee could demonstrate, including “Our heads are up, not down;” “Everyone pitches in…titles don’t matter;” and “Help in choosing, not choices.” Employees were given a brand book which covered the brand principles, including a breakdown of what’s different “tomorrow from today.” The launch kit for leaders and branch managers included a DVD and materials covering key messages and talking points, along with anticipated questions and answers to prepare them to lead discussions with their teams. Click for more info

See full list of CX Tips

CX Tip #24: Define Competencies for Living the Brand

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CX Tip #24: Define Competencies for Living the Brand
(Compelling Brand Values)

Microsoft defined six values to support its corporate mission: To enable people and businesses throughout the world to realize their full potential Of the values created towards this mission, a Passion for Customers, Partners, and Technology. To foster its values, Microsoft has developed a set of key competencies (core, leadership & profession specific) that every employee is measured against in terms of their proficiency in demonstrated behaviors. The competencies help to plan careers, build necessary capabilities for success in a role, and inform performance reviews. “Customer Focus” is core competency for all employees, measured on a 5 point proficiency scale. Click for more info

See full list of CX Tips

CX Tip #34: Create Path for Grassroots Communications

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CX Tip #34: Create Paths for Grassroots Communications
(Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement)

Started in the early 1990s, PRIDE Teams—made up of a network of 700+ employees—are one of USAA’s ongoing listening efforts. Each of the 70+ teams is led by a director or executive director who facilitates grass roots communications across the organization. PRIDE Team members have their day jobs, but spend up to ten percent of their time on two-way communications between the team and their workplace colleagues. They reinforce key messages from senior leadership and connect with their peers, bringing key insights from their colleagues to USAA leaders. Click for more info

See full list of CX Tips

CX Tip #35: Make Your Brand Values Explicit

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CX Tip #35: Make Your Brand Values Explicit
(Compelling Brand Values)

Based on customer research, Safelite AutoGlass has identified five brand values—Trustworthy, Reliable, Safe, Innovative, Helpful/approachable. These have been translated into how customers are treated in a variety of ways, including how phones are answered by contact center associates to the “5 Ts” that their field technicians use to highlight their helpfulness and approachability:  1) Time: Call customers in advance to notify them of arrival time. 2) Touch: Shake hands, make eye contact and engage the customer. 3) Technical excellence: Doing it right the first time, every time. 4) Talk: Tell the customer what we’re going to do and do it. 5) Thanks: Show appreciation for choosing Safelite. Click for more info

See full list of CX Tips

CX Tip #40: Measure Yourself Against Your Brand Promises

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CX Tip #40: Measure Yourself Against Your Brand Promises
(Compelling Brand Values)

Intersil, a semiconductor manufacturer, regularly surveys customers to measure its performance in meeting the company’s brand promise to be “Simply Smarter.” The organization has a formal process for reviewing the results and taking action if it finds that the company is not living up to its brand promise. In one survey, Intersil foiund that cusotmers were having a hard time finding information on its website. The company identified this as a breaking of the promise to be “Simply Smarter” so it invested in updating the usability of its online experience. Click for more info

See full list of CX Tips

CX Tip #46: Translate Your Brand Into Employee Behaviors

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CX Tip #46: Translate Your Brand Into Employee Behaviors
(Compelling Brand Values)

Companies need to make their brands more concrete and get the organization to interpret it into specific requirements. JetBlue, translated its “Jetitude” marketing campaign into five specific behaviors for its front line employees: 1) Be in Blue always, 2) Be personal, 3) Be the answer, 4) Be engaging, 5) Be thankful to every customer. Click for more info

See full list of CX Tips

50 CX Tips: Simple Ideas, Powerful Results

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***See free eBook and infographic with the 50 CX Tips***

As part of Temkin Group’s celebration of Customer Experience Day on October 1st, I am publishing 50 CX Tips, starting 50 days before this exciting “CX holiday” that celebrates great customer experience and the professionals who make it happen. Here’s the (evolving) list of CX tips aligned with the four customer experience core competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness. CX Tip #1: Help Customers Achieve Their Goals (Customer Connectedness)

Don’t push your products and agendas on customers. Instead, find out what they want and create experiences that fit your company into their journey. Wayne Peacock, Executive Vice President of Member Experience at USAA has said:

“We want to create experiences around what members are trying to accomplish, not just our products. If a member is buying a car, then we would historically see that as a change in auto insurance. We are changing that to an auto event – to help the member find the right car, buy it at a discount, get a loan, insurance, etc. and do that in any channel and across channels. There’s enormous value for members and for USAA if we can facilitate that entire experience.” Click for more info

CX Tip #2: Make Employee Engagement a Key Metric (Employee Engagement)

Since 2007, Bombardier Aerospace’s annual employee engagement and enablement survey has given all employees a voice within the organization. In 2012, 93% of employees completed the survey. Managers are evaluated based on the engagement levels of their employees. To create an environment that ensures performance, every leader has an annual target for employee engagement. Click for more info

CX Tip #3: Regularly Refresh Your Brand Promises (Compelling Brand Values)

Starbucks CEO Howard Shultz once said “Customers must recognize that you stand for something.” While most organizations start with a clear brand promise, the focus on short term goals can easily push them away from delivering on it. Decisions across an organization may seem reasonable in their immediate context, but they can collectively push a company off its course.

Once the brand promise is lost, organizations will often spiral out of control without the brand as their True North guiding the way. That’s what happened to Starbucks in 2007. Shultz returned to the company in early 2008 to help restore the brand promise. His assessment of the situation: “We lost our way.” The company closed more than 7,000 stores on one day for a three-hour session to re-instill the brand promise with employees.

Rather than waiting for the painful recognition that your organization has lost its way, examine your brand promise at least every two years. Even if nothing changes, the process of reaffirming your brand can be powerful. Make sure that your brand promises are recognizable, believable, compelling, and well understood by both customers and employees.

CX Tip #4: Make Every Ending Count (Customer Connectedness)

People make decisions based on how they remember experiences, not on how they actually experience them. This distinction is important because people don’t remember experiences the way they actually occur. Memories are constructed as stories people create in their minds based on fragments of their actual experiences. Noble Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman’s research identified something called the “peak-end rule,” which states that people’s memories tend to be heavily influenced by the most severe (good/bad) parts of an experience and the way it ends. So improving the way you end experiences will have a disproportional effect on what customers remember. Keep this in mind when you’re developing an approach for how service reps end a call, designing the confirmation page after an online application, training technicians to close out a job in the field, or developing the discharge process for a hospital.

CX Tip #5: Lead with “Why” in Communications (Purposeful Leadership, Employee Engagement)

How does Herb Kelleher, Founder of Southwest Airlines, describe the company’s secret to success?

“If you create an environment where the people truly participate, you don’t need control. They know what needs to be done and they do it. And the more that people will devote themselves to your cause on a voluntary basis, a willing basis, the fewer hierarchies and control mechanisms you need.”

To elicit this type of connection with employees, leaders must focus their communications on answering a critical question, “why?” Most corporate communications focus on “what” and “how,” telling people what needs to be done and how they should accomplish it. This command and control pattern may elicit short-term compliance, but it’s efficacy decays quickly and it loses value completely when situations change and the “how” no longer applies. Leaders need to elicit buy-in from people by starting communications with “why,” explaining the reason that something is important to the company and to the people who are being asked to do something. To fully empower people, share “why” a goal is important and “what” success looks like and leave it up to the individuals to figure out “how” to make it happen. Click for more info

CX Tip #6: Measure the Value of Key CX Metrics (Customer Connectedness)

If you know the value of improving a CX metric, then it’s easier to make the case for investments. JetBlue has previously measured that every promoter is worth $33 extra dollars ($27 from referrals and $6 from loyalty) to while a detractor is worth $104 less than average. One point change in JetBlue’s NPS is worth $5 to $8 million. Temkin Group research shows that a modest increase in the Temkin Experience Ratings can result in a gain over three years of up to $382 million for US companies and up to £263 million for UK firms, depending on the industry. It’s important for companies to develop this type of analysis for their business. Click for more info

CX Tip #7: Motivate Employees with Intrinsic Rewards (Employee Engagement)

Companies often try and force employees into doing things by slapping on metrics and measurements. While these types of extrinsic rewards can change some behaviors, they can often cause conflicts and lead to unexpected consequences. When Staples put in place a goal for $200 of add-ons per computer sold, some store employees stopped selling computers to customers who didn’t want to purchase add-ons.  Compare this outcome to inspirational coaching at Sprint, which leads to an environment where employees consistently excel and measure their performance against their best effort and compete with themselves to be their best. It turns out that people tend to be more motivated by intrinsic rewards. To build commitment from employees, stop relying so heavily on extrinsic rewards and focus on providing them with the four key intrinsic rewards: sense of meaningfulness, choice, competence, and progress. These types of rewards build an emotional, instead of a transactional, commitment from employees.

CX Tip #8: Start Your Brand Marketing Internally (Compelling Brand Values)

Brands need to be understood and “owned” by the entire organization. That’s why it’s critical for companies to invest heavily in communicating the brand value to everyone in the company. Before BMO Financial Group’s new brand went live, it launched an internal campaign, Brilliant at the Basics, which identified eight actions that every employee could demonstrate, including “Our heads are up, not down;” “Everyone pitches in…titles don’t matter;” and “Help in choosing, not choices.” Employees were given a brand book which covered the brand principles, including a breakdown of what’s different “tomorrow from today.” The launch kit for leaders and branch managers included a DVD and materials covering key messages and talking points, along with anticipated questions and answers to prepare them to lead discussions with their teams. Click for more info

CX Tip #9: Bring Customers to Life With Design Personas (Customer Connectedness)

Big Lots CEO David Campisi mentioned “Jennifer” 25 times on a single earnings call. She’s not a real customer or even a real person. Jennifer is a design persona, an archetype that is representative of a key customer segment. Here’s why Campisi believes in using a design persona:

“I am confident in developing a new mentality to focus on her and all facets of our business will pay off and begin to drive positive comps over time.”

One of our 10 CX Mistakes to Avoid is Treating All Customers the Same. Organizations need to identify key customer segments and design experiences to meet their specific needs. Design personas help an organization have a common understanding of the needs of those segments.

Click for more info

CX Tip #10: Tap Into Customer Insights from Unstructured Data (Customer Connectedness)

As more companies thirst for customer feedback, the number of surveys has escalated. But there is a limit to customers’ willingness to complete surveys. As completion rates get more difficult to maintain, companies will become more efficient with the questions they ask, target questions at specific customers in specific situations, and stop relying as much on multiple-choice questions. Tidbit: When we asked large companies with VoC programs about the changing importance of eight listening posts, multiple choice survey questions were at the bottom of the list. Companies must learn to integrate their customer feedback with other customer data and tap into rich sources of customer insights in unstructured data such as open-ended comments, call center conversations, emails from customers, and social media. This new, deeper foundation of customer intelligence will require strengthening capabilities in text and predictive analytics. Click for more info

CX Tip #11: Predict and Preempt Obstacles to Customer Value (Customer Connectedness)

Thanks in part to sophisticated adoption measurement capabilities that allow Salesforce.com to monitor how customers are (or are not) using the product and individual features, account teams now have access to reporting and predictive analytics alerting them to which clients are on plan and which are struggling. The analysis provides a view into how the customer is doing relative to their individual deployment goals, industry peers, and ideal deployment paths based on Salesforce.com’s experience. Included with the analysis are suggested interventions for the account team to pursue with the client based on the current state. On a monthly basis, the company reviews at-risk customers to address anything that might contribute to attrition. Click for more info

CX Tip #12: Map Your Customer’s Journey (Customer Connectedness)

BMO Financial’s approach to customer journey mapping includes both the customer view and the internal view. This ensures not only that customers’ reactions are represented for each touchpoint, but that the impact of internal policies, training, and measures and targets for each interaction are also factored in. Internal stakeholder interviews and employee focus groups provide the view of “what we think happens” and external research identifies customers’ needs and wants as part of mapping the ideal experience. A gap analysis is used to gain agreement on the opportunities, which are then incorporated into customer experience action plans. Check out Temkin Group’s Seven Steps for Developing Customer Journey Maps

CX Tip #13: Cultivate Experience Design Skills (Customer Connectedness)

Through its Design Matters initiative, Citrix helps its employees rethink core business processes with a focus on customer needs. They learn to collaborate on ideas to meet those needs, prototype and test with customers, and integrate feedback to deliver solutions such as an online customer “onboarding” experience to help new customers get up and running with their flagship product. A network of employee Design Catalysts, who are specially trained to help colleagues use design thinking on a daily basis, supports this work. Click for more info

CX Tip #14: Continuously Test Your Value Proposition (Purposeful Leadership)

Samuel Palmisano revitalized IBM during his decade as CEO of the IT behemoth. He led the company using a framework based on four questions that he used to focus thinking and prod the company beyond its comfort zone:

  1. Why would someone spend their money with you — so what is unique about you?
  2. Why would somebody work for you?
  3. Why would society allow you to operate in their defined geography — their country?
  4. And why would somebody invest their money with you?

Click for more info

CX Tip #15: Close the Loop Immediately with Detractors (Customer Connectedness)

VMware has a dedicated Customer Advocacy Team, which is tasked to contact severe detractors within 48 hours of a survey response. This team pulls appropriate members of the account and support teams into the resolution process. The Customer Advocacy Team retains responsibility for ongoing customer communication, monitoring internal progress, and following up with the customer upon conclusion. Click for more info

CX Tip #16: Analyze Promoters and Detractors Separately (Customer Connectedness)

Companies often focus their efforts obsessing about why customers are unhappy. While this is great for eliminating detractors, it may not actually increase customer loyalty. Why? Because loyalty is not the opposite of dissatisfaction. In addition to analyzing unhappiness, you should also analyze what makes customers really happy and loyal, which is often more than just eliminating problems. A focus on loyalty will also create a more positive vibe inside of an organization, since it’s a good counter-balance with the overwhelming negative feelings that can be associated with discussions about problems.

CX Tip #17: Discuss Feedback with B2B Clients (Customer Connectedness)

A unique element to SanDisk’s VoC program is its external roadshow to meet with customers about their survey results. Following internal review and reporting, account managers work with the CX governance board to identify a subset of customers to meet with face to face. Approximately 70% of the information reviewed with the customer is drawn from their specific survey responses, and account managers also review trends and insights from across all customer feedback and the actions being taken by SanDisk to address them. Click for more info

CX Tip #18: Remove Jargon from Customer Communications (Purposeful Leadership)

Standing out from the BCBS of Michigan’s accomplishments is its Clear and Simple effort to help the business become easier to understand and do business with. BCBS of Michigan’s Customer Commitment guides the way the organization serves its members. It focuses the company on being easier to understand and do business with in everything from language to business practices. The related Clear and Simple effort generated over 50 requests from across the business to help different areas become more clear and simple, and involved 375 employees in those improvement projects. Click for more info

CX Tip #19: Use Ambassadors to Build Links Across Organization (Employee Engagement)

Fidelity’s Voice of the Customer Ambassadors program is the cornerstone of Fidelity’s efforts to engage customer-facing associates across the organization around their customer experience vision. Ambassadors are associates from across Fidelity’s functions who apply to become part of a network of customer experience evangelists who (1) identify opportunities for improvement by amplifying the voice of the customer/associate; (2) inform new product and service development; and (3) inspire their peers with local dialogue and other activities. Ambassadors are supported by extensive executive sponsorship across multiple levels of management and are asked to dedicate 10% of their time influencing Fidelity’s shared customer experience vision. Click for more info

CX Tip #20: Use Founders to Instill Values with New Employees (Purposeful Leadership, Employee Engagement)

The first day at work for new ZocDoc employees includes lunch with the company founders. During the course of the meal, employees hear about the early days of the company, what the executives are focused on now, and what they love about the organization. Employees hear about the 7 Core Values and see them in action. In particular, this lunch reinforces the “Speak Up” core value which is about leadership accessibility and that everyone in the company has a voice – that their questions and opinions matter.

CX Tip #21: Set Service Targets Based on Customer Expectations (Customer Connectedness)

Recognizing that it needed to establish targets for execution based on customer expectations, and not just on its operational ability to execute, EMC added customer experience focus questions around the customer’s expectations during a service event. For example, a question was added that asks the customer what timeframe between updates they would find acceptable. EMC uses a Van Westendorp Methodology to analyze the customer’s responses that helped determine the optimum timeframe for progress updates as it relates to the customers expectation. Knowing what the customer expected allowed EMC to add or improve processes and set customer quality targets within the support organization to better meet or beat the customer’s expectation. Click for more info

CX Tip #22: Actively Solicit Insights from Employees (Employee Engagement, Customer Connectedness)

Adobe’s Intranet includes an online suggestion tool called “Tell Adobe.” Through this simple mechanism, employees can submit suggestions for improving the company, covering everything from current products and services to the processes used to engage and help customers. All submissions are reviewed by a member of the People Resources team, who then brings in internal subject matter experts or functional teams to evaluate the submitter’s suggestions, work with him or her to understand the idea better, and then decide if and how to proceed or pursue further. The process closes the loop with the employee so that he or she has visibility to the outcomes resulting from the initial submission. Click for more info

CX Tip #23: Share Customer Verbatims Internally (Customer Connectedness)

Troy Stevenson, Vice President, Client Loyalty & Consumer Insight at Charles Schwab stressed the value of listening to client verbatims, saying that “There’s no substitute for employees reading through unadulterated client comments. They explain what needs to change and how they need to change.” Stevenson’s team analyzes cross-organization topics (like affluent consumers), but a critical goal is to put the information in the hands of the people that understand different parts of the business. Stevenson’s team organizes verbatims by themes and topics and then puts them in the hands of the appropriate people across the company. He estimates that thousands of people read the verbatims including every branch and call center team. Click for more info

CX Tip #24: Define Competencies for Living the Brand (Compelling Brand Values)

Microsoft defined six values to support its corporate mission: To enable people and businesses throughout the world to realize their full potential Of the values created towards this mission, a Passion for Customers, Partners, and Technology. To foster its values, Microsoft has developed a set of key competencies (core, leadership & profession specific) that every employee is measured against in terms of their proficiency in demonstrated behaviors. The competencies help to plan careers, build necessary capabilities for success in a role, and inform performance reviews. “Customer Focus” is core competency for all employees, measured on a 5 point proficiency scale. Click for more info

CX Tip #25: Use Online Advisory Boards of B2B Clients (Customer Connectedness)

Technology solutions provider CDW has engaged clients through a private online community for over seven years. Using open-ended questions or short surveys, the company can gather a significant amount of feedback on a variety of topics including new product offerings, marketing messages, and customer technology usage—in less than a week. Members also have the ability to pose questions to each other. For example, a member recently received numerous responses to his inquiry on other members’ Bring Your Own Device policies. Click for more info

CX Tip #26: Train Employees for Key Moments (Customer Connectedness, Employee Engagement)

This is from a New York Times article about Apple:

Training commences with what is known as a “warm welcome.” As new employees enter the room, Apple managers and trainers give them a standing ovation. The clapping often bewilders the trainees, at least at first, but when the applause goes on for several lengthy minutes they eventually join in. There is more role-playing at Core training, as it’s known, this time with pointers on the elaborate etiquette of interacting with customers. One rule: ask for permission before touching anyone’s iPhone. “And we told trainees that the first thing they needed to do was acknowledge the problem, though don’t promise you can fix the problem,” said Shane Garcia, the one-time Chicago manager. “If you can, let them know that you have felt some of the emotions they are feeling. But you have to be careful because you don’t want to lie about that.” 

CX Tip #27: Continuously Re-Recruit Your Team (Purposeful Leadership)

Linda Heasley, CEO of Lane Bryant and former president and CEO of The Limited has said:

I believe that my associates can work anywhere they want, and my job is to re-recruit them every day and give them a reason to choose to work for us and for me as opposed to anybody else.”

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CX Tip #28: Share Comparative CX Metrics Across Locations (Customer Connectedness, Employee engagement)

Each of Sam’s Club’s 600+ stores gets a monthly score they call the “Member Experience Track” (MET) which covers three areas: In-club operations, Merchandising, and Membership. Underneath those three areas are more than 150 individual attributes that the company tracks. Each store has an overall rating of red (bad), yellow (“okay”), or green (“good”) based on surveys completed by members. At monthly meetings, the executive team reviews a dashboard that highlights the number of stores in each category (red, yellow, green), looks at key issues driving problems across stores, and also looks at the top 20 and bottom 20 stores. This is a powerful tool for motivating store managers, as Bala Subramanian, VP of Global Customer Insights points out: “You don’t want to be called out on the bottom as a member of the ‘Red Club.’” Click for more info

CX Tip #29: Innovate Around Customer Lifecycle Events (Customer Connectedness)

Sovereign Assurance NZ’s research showed that many new parents don’t have the time to review their life insurance, but after having a new baby, it’s more important than ever to have some life insurance. The company developed a program “Choose Precious” that offers new parents $10,000 free life insurance up until their baby’s first birthday. New parents just need to register at chooseprecious.co.nz before their baby is six‐months old. The company also rolled out its ‘Breathing Space’ offering. Recognizing that buying a home is a big deal and it’s difficult to get the attention of home buyers, can be difficult to attract, the company offered home buyers $25,000 free life cover for 90 days to provide interim protection until they have the time to consider their longer term protection needs. Click for more info

CX Tip #30: Encourage Employees to Thank Customers (Employee Engagement, Customer Connectedness)

Sprint’s Thank You Thursdays helps keep customers top of mind. Employees at offices, call centers, and retail stores enjoy getting together monthly to collectively write personal thank you notes to customers. Supplies and sample notes are provided, but employees are free to express thanks in their own words. Even the CEO participates in this activity. Sprint sent more than 700,000 thank you notes in 2012. Click for more info

CX Tip #31: Develop Simple Service Standards (Customer Connectedness, Employee Engagement)

NBA’s Oklahoma Thunder has identified five CLICK!™ With Your Guests non-negotiable service principles:

  • C – COMMUNICATE COURTEOUSLY (practice the golden rule)
  • L – LISTEN TO LEARN (rather than listen to respond)
  • I – INITIATE IMMEDIATELY (being proactive)
  • C – CREATE CONNECTIONS (everyone is a VIP)
  • K – KNOW YOUR STUFF (knowledge is power)

All front‐line team members, from parking to concessions, participate in the required CLICK! With Your Guests on-boarding program, which provides training and tools to create memorable experiences. Click for more info

CX Tip #32: Create a Mission that Inspires Employees (Purposeful Leadership, Employee Engagement)

Temkin Group research shows that employees who are inspired by their employer’s mission are significantly more committed and productive. Here are some examples of inspiring missions:

“To inspire hope and contribute to health and well-being by providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research.” (Mayo Clinic) “In times of war or uncertainty there is a special breed of warrior ready to answer our Nation’s call. A common man with uncommon desire to succeed. Forged by adversity, he stands alongside America’s finest special operations forces to serve his country, the American people, and protect their way of life. I am that man.” (U.S. Navy SEALS) “The Ritz-Carlton Hotel is a place where the genuine care and comfort of our guests is our highest mission. We pledge to provide the finest personal service and facilities for our guests who will always enjoy a warm, relaxed, yet refined ambience. The Ritz-Carlton experience enlivens the senses, instills well-being, and fulfills even the unexpressed wishes and needs of our guests.” (Ritz-Carlton’s Credo)

Here are five questions to examine your organization’s mission: Is it written? Is it real? Is it simple? Does it connect with employees? Will it create value?  Click for more info

CX Tip #33: Adopt Coach K’s Five Fundamentals of Team Building (Purposeful Leadership, Employee Engagement)

Michael William “Mike” Krzyzewski known as “Coach K” owns the record for the most wins by an NCAA division 1 basketball coach. Coach K’s style is to empower, challenge, and inspire his players. He recognizes that wins are the byproduct of a team performing at its best. To understand his leadership style, here’s an overview of his philosophy on teams:

There are five fundamental qualities that make every team great: communication, trust, collective responsibility, caring and pride. I like to think of each as a separate finger on the fist. Any one individually is important. But all of them together are unbeatable.”

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CX Tip #34: Create Paths for Grassroots Communications (Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement)

Started in the early 1990s, PRIDE Teams—made up of a network of 700+ employees—are one of USAA’s ongoing listening efforts. Each of the 70+ teams is led by a director or executive director who facilitates grass roots communications across the organization. PRIDE Team members have their day jobs, but spend up to ten percent of their time on two-way communications between the team and their workplace colleagues. They reinforce key messages from senior leadership and connect with their peers, bringing key insights from their colleagues to USAA leaders. Click for more info

CX Tip #35: Make Your Brand Values Explicit (Compelling Brand Values)

Based on customer research, Safelite AutoGlass has identified five brand values—Trustworthy, Reliable, Safe, Innovative, Helpful/approachable. These have been translated into how customers are treated in a variety of ways, including how phones are answered by contact center associates to the “5 Ts” that their field technicians use to highlight their helpfulness and approachability:  1) Time: Call customers in advance to notify them of arrival time. 2) Touch: Shake hands, make eye contact and engage the customer. 3) Technical excellence: Doing it right the first time, every time. 4) Talk: Tell the customer what we’re going to do and do it. 5) Thanks: Show appreciation for choosing Safelite. Click for more info

CX Tip #36: Maintain List of Top 10 Customer Issues (Customer Connectedness)

Oracle drives consistent customer experience activities across all regions and lines of business through a structured framework and standardized approach to monitoring the customer experience: Listen, Respond, Collaborate for Customer Success. The portfolio of feedback tools includes transactional and product surveys, relationship surveys, customer advisory boards, user experience labs, and independent user groups. Feedback from across these sources is integrated and analyzed to identify the 10 customer feedback themes that have the greatest impact on customer experience and business results, and programs are established to improve each. Click for more info

CX Tip #37: Test for Cultural Fit Before You Hire (Employee Engagement)

To test how well prospective employees will fit with its company culture, Disney Store’s interview is actually a “casting call” and includes role playing in-store scenarios to demonstrate potential guest interactions and reading a portion of a Disney story, which is part of the job description.

CX Tip #38: Discuss CX Metrics and Initiatives at Company Meetings (Purposeful Leadership)

To keep employees aligned, leaders discuss customer experience in every quarterly employee meeting. Citrix executives share initiatives and progress against goals for key customer metrics. Through reporting and dashboards, customer metrics such as NPS and customer retention are shared broadly throughout the business. In addition, the company shares deep-dive analysis of drivers and opportunities for improvement.

CX Tip #39: Use Workshops to Review Customer Feedback and Develop Local Action Plans (Customer Connectedness, Employee Engagement)

SimplexGrinnell (a Tyco Company) has what it calls NICE workshops, interactive sessions where local offices review customer verbatims and develop action plans.  These are highly focused 5-hour interactive on-site session for key district personnel (managers, admin, and front-line) to develop an action plan for improving their customer experience with district service delivery. In small teams, workshop attendees are exposed to their district CSAT metrics and customer verbatim comments drawn from 80 to 100 of their customers that were surveyed over the past 12 months. Using that customer feedback, they identify and agree upon their most prevalent service delivery challenges. They brainstorm new and best service practices to implement within the next 30 days that will begin to make an impact on customer satisfaction within the next 90 days. Click for more info

CX Tip #40: Measure Yourself Against Your Brand Promises (Compelling Brand Values)

Intersil, a semiconductor manufacturer, regularly surveys customers to measure its performance in meeting the company’s brand promise to be “Simply Smarter.” The organization has a formal process for reviewing the results and taking action if it finds that the company is not living up to its brand promise. In one survey, Intersil foiund that cusotmers were having a hard time finding information on its website. The company identified this as a breaking of the promise to be “Simply Smarter” so it invested in updating the usability of its online experience. Click for more info

CX Tip #41: Create Peer-to-Peer Executive Relationships with B2B Clients (Purposeful Leadership, Customer Connectedness)

Stream Global Service’s Executive Sponsorship Program charges Stream’s senior leaders with establishing peer-to-peer relationships with senior executives from one to three of its largest clients. The goals of this program are to extend the relationship beyond the sales team, to better understand the customer’s business direction and goals, and to ensure the customer is receiving the value it expects from Stream. On a quarterly basis, the two leaders meet with each other and discuss the customer’s big initiatives, functional area goals, and how Stream can support their efforts. Feedback from these meetings is integrated with other VoC captured from that customer relationship. Click for more info

CX Tip #42: Make it Easy for Employees to Be Brand Advocates (Customer Connectedness, Employee Engagement)

Microsoft’s Quick Assistance program is used when employees encounter consumers in social situations (e.g., meeting someone on a flight). The program positions employees as ambassadors and allows them to provide no-charge technical support incident vouchers to customers. Employees are able to request and deliver vouchers directly from their mobile phone.

CX Tip #43: Randomly Call Out to B2B Clients (Customer Connectedness)

The law firm Becker and Poliakoff staffs a dedicated client care department and uses those same specially trained employees to proactively contact 2,500 randomly selected clients each year. This continuous feedback process gathers input on the attorney and other service providers involved with the account, along with an open dialogue on how the firm’s professionals are serving them and what the firm could be doing better. Surveys are timed to occur in advance of annual client renewal periods and feedback is provided to both the client relationship manager and practice group leader. These outbound calls have also resulted in the client care team more proactively addressing both minor and major issues. Click for more info

CX Tip #44: Create a Help Line for Employees (Employee Engagement)

All Hilton Garden Inn employees – from management to the front line – have access to a dedicated Advice Line. This provide employees a toll-free number or monitored email address through which they can get an answer to any question that’s taken them more than five minutes to find the answer to. It’s intended to make it easy for employees to get the knowledge or help they need quickly.

CX Tip #45: Use Blog to Connect CEO with Employees (Purposeful Leadership)

Safelite AutoGlass’s CEO, Tom Feeney, maintains his “Ask Tom” blog where any employee can ask any question with no fear of retribution. Mr. Feeney researches the answers and provides a personal response.

CX Tip #46: Translate Your Brand Into Employee Behaviors (Compelling Brand Values)

Companies need to make their brands more concrete and get the organization to interpret it into specific requirements. JetBlue, translated its “Jetitude” marketing campaign into five specific behaviors for its front line employees: 1) Be in Blue always, 2) Be personal, 3) Be the answer, 4) Be engaging, 5) Be thankful to every customer. Click more info

CX Tip #47: Use Job Shadowing to Improve Cross-Channel Cooperation (Employee Engagement)

Sprint uses a cross-channel program to create more engagement between call center and retail store employees. Each group visits the others’ locations for job shadowing in order to gain a greater appreciation of the customer experience and operations in each other’s settings and identify lessons to bring back to their own workplace. Click for more info

CX Tip #48: Empower Employees to Create Memorable Moments (Employee Engagement)

Hampton has trained its team members on a set of Moment Makers rather than checklists and scripts to handle a variety of situations. Moment Makers are designed so that team members can choose approaches based on their personality, comfort level, and individual style to match the cues from guests. These approaches include being anticipatory, using empathy, using humor, providing unexpected delight, and giving a compliment. Moment Makers are taught from a team member’s first days on the job when he or she learns the brand story and continue to be reinforced on an ongoing basis through learning maps and e-learning modules. Click for more info

CX Tip #49: Obsess About Customers, Not Competitors (Purposeful Leadership)

Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos has said: “Our energy at Amazon comes from the desire to impress customers rather than the zeal to best competitors… One advantage – perhaps a somewhat subtle one – of a customer-driven focus is that it aids a certain type of proactivity. When we’re at our best, we don’t wait for external pressures. We are internally driven to improve our services, adding benefits and features, before we have to.”

CX Tip #50: Don’t Overlook Low-Tech Opportunities for Customer Research (Customer Connectedness)

When using Intuit’s IVR (the menu of options customers hear when they call), customers were getting incorrectly routed 40% of the time. Since it took 10 days to reprogram the IVR, they couldn’t try a lot of things in the normal way. So one engineer said let’s do this the old fashioned way; and they did. People answered the phone and spoke the menus. By trial and error, they found a menu structure that worked before reprograming the IVR. Click for more info

Stay tuned for additional CX Tips…

Report: The State of Customer Experience Management, 2013

StateOfCX2013_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Management, 2013. The research shows where large companies are along their customer experience journeys. Here’s the executive summary:

We surveyed more than 200 large companies and found an abundance of Customer Experience (CX) ambition and activity. Most companies have a CX executive leading the charge, significant CX activities being coordinated by a central team, and a staff of six to 10 full-time CX professionals. Using Temkin Group’s CX competency assessment, we found that only six percent of companies have reached the highest two levels of customer experience maturity as firms struggle the most to master Employee Engagement and Compelling Brand Values. When compared with CX Laggards, CX Leaders have stronger financial results, more CX ambition, more CX leadership, and they are more successful with their employee engagement efforts. Executives in companies with stronger CX competencies also focus more on delighting customers and less on cutting costs.

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Here are some of the findings from the research:

  • While only eight percent of companies believe that they are leading their industries in CX today, 62% have goals to be the best within three years
  • Sixty-one percent of respondents have a senior executive in charge of the company’s overall CX efforts and 71%  have a centralized CX group
  • The median firm in our study has six to 10 full time CX employees
  • Seven out of ten respondents identified “other competing priorities” as a significant obstacle to their CX efforts
  • Only six percent of the companies that completed our CX Competency and Maturity Assessment have made it to the top two levels of maturity, Align and Embed
  • We compared companies with leading CX efforts with other firms and found that they have better financial performance, more centralized CX activities, better employee engagement, stronger employee engagement, and more management attention to corporate culture

CxLeadersLaggards

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The bottom line: Most companies remain in the early stages of CX maturity

Report: Best Practices in B2B Customer Experience

1304_B2BCXBest Practices_v2We just published a Temkin Group report, Best Practices in B2B Customer Experience. Here’s the executive summary:

Customer experience is gaining more attention within business-to-business (B2B) organizations. Rightfully so—customer experience drives loyalty with business customers. At the same time, clients and prospects, who increasingly compare business interactions with their personal consumer experiences, are raising the expectations of B2B relationships. While our research has shown that most B2Bs are still mastering the basics, our interviews with 28 companies uncovered best practices for building a more client-oriented mindset through closed-loop voice of the customer programs, customer journey maps, and virtual client advisory boards. Using the customer insights they collect, forward-thinking B2B organizations are becoming more client-centric in how they develop new business, create account plans, and proactively provide support (or intervene when service breakdowns occur). To sustain superior customer experience, B2B firms must master four competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness.

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The report identifies many best practices across two areas:

  • Building a client-oriented mindset. Organizations have a natural tendency to operate from an internal perspective, focusing on the needs of their functional silos more than on their clients. To offset this tendency, B2B firms need to build repeatable and systematic processes for gathering, analyzing, and taking action on customer insights. The report identifies best practices in the following areas:
    • Develop Closed-Loop Voice of the Client (VoC) Programs. Having a reliable flow of customer insights across the organization is critical to driving customer-centric actions.
    • Use Journey Maps to Better Understand Clients’ Needs. To better understand how clients see their experiences, B2B organizations can use a tool known as customer journey mapping.
    • Tap Into Virtual Client Advisory Boards. Client advisory boards (CAB) and councils provide the opportunity to acquire more insight into customer needs and expectations.
  • Building client-centric relationship management. Today, account management functions tend to be oriented around sales generation and firefighting. To build stronger, longer-term ties with clients, Temkin Group expects that B2B firms will head towards a more client-centric model of account management that uses client insights throughout the relationship management continuum. The report identifies best practices in the following areas:
    • Account-Level Experience Reporting. To acquire, retain, and grow B2B relationships, account managers need to understand what’s working and not working for each of their clients.
    • Insightful Business Development. B2B organizations that gather and use the right customer insights during this early stage will create a differentiated experience from the start of the relationship
    • Collaborative Account Planning. By taking a structured and collaborative approach to developing in-depth account plans, companies can tap into their enterprise knowledge.
    • Proactive Intervention and Support. B2B organizations need to use customer insights and feedback from account managers to intervene in service experiences gone wrong as quickly as possible with well-defined, robust recovery procedures.

The report provides a plethora of specific practices in these areas from companies such as Becker and Poliakoff, CDW, Cisco, Citrix, DellEnterasys, EquinixGenworth Financial, Lithium, Lynden, Philadelphia Insurance Companies, OracleSalesforce.com, SanDiskStream Global, Verint, and VMware.

B2BCXBestPractices

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The bottom line: B2B companies need more customer-centric enterprise relationships

 

Report: The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies

Temkin Group just published an update to the report that defines one of our fundamental frameworks, The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies. This report lays out the building blocks for customer experience success. This topic is so important that we’re giving this report away for free. Here’s the executive summary:

Research shows that customer experience is highly correlated with loyalty. While any company can improve portions of its customer experience, it takes more than a few superficial changes to create lasting differentiation. Organizations that want to become customer experience leaders need to master four customer experience competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Employee Engagement, Compelling Brand Values, and Customer Connectedness. To gauge your progress, actively use Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency and Maturity Assessment. This assessment will identify areas of strength and weakness in your CX efforts as well as identify your progress along six stages of CX maturity: Ignore  Explore, Mobilize, Operationalize, Align, and Embed.

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4Competencies

Here’s how I describe the four CX Competencies:

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The bottom line: It’s time to improve your CX competencies

 

Report: Lessons in CX Excellence

We just published a Temkin Group report, Lessons in CX Excellence. This 127 page report provides a rich set of best practices and a glimpse into the customer experience efforts of 11 companies that were finalists in Temkin Group’s 2012 Customer Experience Excellence Awards. Here’s the executive summary:

The following 11 organizations are finalists in Temkin Group’s 2012 Customer Experience Excellence Awards: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, Bombardier Aerospace, Citrix, EMC, Fidelity Investments, JetBlue Airways, Microsoft, Oklahoma City Thunder, Oracle, Safelite AutoGlass, and Sovereign Assurance NZ. This document provides highlights of their customer experience efforts and best practices across the four customer experience competencies: Purposeful leadership, compelling brand values, employee engagement,  and customer connectedness. The report also includes the finalists’ detailed nomination forms.

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Here are excerpts of our description from each of the finalists:

  • In just 17 months, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan assembled its customer experience team and leveraged a variety of insights and data to devise a comprehensive strategy to “Find and Fix” near-term opportunities and “Transform” the organization to be customer-centric at its core.
  • Bombardier Aerospace drives continuous improvement through its multi-faceted Amazing Customer Experience (ACE) initiative. Customer feedback is essential to ACE and is gathered through a variety of channels including surveys, customer forums, and Bombardier’s Executive Listening Program.
  • Citrix places an emphasis on giving customers a voice in its product roadmap and building a user-centered culture in order to continuously improve its products, services, and experiences. Through the Design Matters initiative, Citrix helps its employees rethink core business processes with a focus on customer needs.
  • EMC has a Total Customer Experience (TCE) program with a mission to enable business growth through improvements based on a customer-focused, data-driven strategy. The program provides ways for customers, partners, and EMC field personnel to provide feedback on their experiences, and measures customer quality in every interaction.
  • Founded on the core value “The Customer Is Always First,” Fidelity Investments has a well-established, well-rounded program that delivers enterprise-wide results. The program is comprised of four integrated elements: Voice of Customer & Associate, End-to-End Process Improvement, Culture & Communications, and Measurement & Rewards.
  • The Customer Insight (CI) team at JetBlue Airways provides the business with a multi-faceted view of its customers through feedback from surveys, text analytics, social media monitoring, and third party benchmarking. The CI team also has a program in place to address all unsolicited customer feedback that is received regardless of source through its Customer Retention Program.
  • Microsoft believes that the better it is at building a culture of accountability, listening and responding to customers, simplifying offerings, and innovating based on customer feedback, the stronger its Customer and Partner Experience (CPE) will be.
  • “Create Repeat Guests Profitably” is the mission of the Guest Relations team of the Oklahoma City Thunder. The team uses various fan feedback platforms to gather feedback including email, text message, telephone, written submissions, and social media, all of which are promoted on the team’s website and during in-game announcements.
  • Oracle drives consistent customer experience activities across all regions and lines of business through a structured framework and standardized approach to monitoring the customer experience: Listen, Respond, Collaborate for Customer Success. The portfolio of feedback tools includes transactional and product surveys, relationship surveys, customer advisory boards, user experience labs, and independent user groups.
  • On the company’s path back from bankruptcy, Safelite AutoGlass CEO Tom Feeney set a goal in 2008 to double business in four years by 1) putting Safelite’s people first by focusing on talent development and employee engagement and 2) going above and beyond to delight every customer.
  • Sovereign Assurance of New Zealand’s strategy is to create customer engagement and advocacy through effortless experiences, with a program of initiatives around four key levers: customers front and center, stickier relationships, maximize touch points, and focus on value.

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The bottom line: There’s a lot to learn from these excellent CX efforts

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