Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2012

We just published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2012. It provides NPS data on 175 U.S. companies across 19 industries. Here’s the executive summary:

USAA took the top two spots for its banking and insurance businesses while HSBC came in at the bottom for banking and credit cards. Our analysis of differences across consumer demographic segments showed that NPS tends to go up with age, doesn’t vary much by income levels, and is often highest with Asians. We also asked consumers what would make them more likely to recommend the companies and found that promoters are more likely to select lower prices and detractors are more likely to select better customer service. While there is some debate about the efficacy of NPS, our analysis shows that promoters are much more likely than detractors to purchase more in the future across all industries. To help you implement a successful NPS program, we’ve included eight tips such as don’t believe in an “ultimate question” and use control charts, not pinpointed goals. The industries included in this report are airlines, auto dealers, banks, computer makers, credit card issuers, fast food chains, grocery chains, health plans, hotel chains, insurance carriers, Internet service providers, investment firms, major appliance makers, parcel delivery services, rental car agencies, retailers, software firms, TV service providers, and wireless carriers.

Download report for $295
(includes the data)

The industries included in this report are airlines, auto dealers, banks, computer makers, credit card issuers, fast food chains, grocery chains, health plans, hotel chains, insurance carriers, Internet service providers, investment firms, major appliance makers, parcel delivery services, rental car agencies, retailers, software firms, TV service providers, and wireless carriers.

The report contains the following components:

  • NPS for 175 companies across 19 industries
  • NPS differences based on age, income, and ethnicity of consumers
  • Improvement areas selected by promoters and detractors by industry
  • Connection between NPS and future purchases by industry
  • Eight tips for implementing a successful NPS program

Figure1Figure4

Download report for $295
(Includes the data)

The bottom line:  Companies need to give customers a reason to recommend them

About Bruce Temkin
I am a customer experience transformist, helping large organizations improve business results by changing how they deal with customers. As part of this focus, I examine strategy, marketing, interaction design, customer service, and leadership practices. I am also a fanatical student of business, so this blog provides an outlet for sharing insights from my ongoing educational journey. Simply put, I am passionate about spotting emerging best practices and helping companies master them. And, as many people know, I love to speak about these topics in almost any forum. My “title” is Managing Partner of the Temkin Group, a customer experience research and consulting firm that helps organizations become more customer-centric. Our goal is simple: accelerate the path to delighting customers. I am also the co-founder and chair of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to the success of CX professionals.

23 Responses to Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2012

  1. Hi Bruce,

    I’ve been looking for B2B specific NPS benchmarks. What percentage of the companies in this report are B2B vs. B2C?

    Thanks!
    Melinda

    • Bruce Temkin says:

      Melinda: This is a completely B2C report, sorry.

      • Thomas Wagg says:

        I found what I believe is a mistakle in your 2012 Oct B2c report where at the bottom of page three you indicate that Asians have the highest NPS in 11 industries. That appears incorrect to a table later in your report where it shows Asians have very few top NPS numbers across ind=uctries and in fact have significant lowest scores… typo, or am I misreading? Thanks in advance.

      • Bruce Temkin says:

        Thomas: Nice catch. There’s a typo in that paragraph where we swapped “highest” and “lowest” between Asians and African-Americans. It’s been updated in the v5 of the report. I’ll resend your link so that you can download the report again. Thanks for brining that to my attention.

      • Thomas Wagg says:

        Bruce, thanks very much. One other question please… I noticed that on the slide”promoters plan to make more future purchases”, the sum of the detractors and Promoters exceed 100%. I understand from Satmatrix that Promoters + Detractors and Passives percentages should never exceed 100%. Can you help me understand what I am misunderstanding in this report . Thanks in advance.

      • Bruce Temkin says:

        I believe that you are referring to Figure 13. Those numbers represent the percentage of each group (Promoters and Detractors) who are likely to make future purchases. In the first case, 88% of airline promoters are likely to make future purchases while only 55% of airline detractors are equally likely. There’s no reason for those two percentages to add up to 100% (or any other number).

      • Thomas Wagg says:

        Perfect thanks. Looking forward to V5 :-)

  2. Sean otto says:

    So….when are you going to do a B2B benchmark report?

    • Bruce Temkin says:

      Sean: We’d love to do it, but haven’t found an (economical) way to do it using our approach of surveying end-customers. Every B2B market has a different set of customers, so they would each need their own survey. We’re open for some ideas…

      • Adam Cringle says:

        Hello Bruce:

        You should invite B2B customers to participate in a benchmark program by establishing some criteria that the company has to meet to be included in the research. Since you are a third party, the company’s NPS could be shared with you only and then you report back on the low, average, high, etc. While it will not be as accurate of a benchmark as you have reported above, it will give each company an idea of where they fall and is far more helpful than what we have now (which is almost nothing). If you want more detail on how this might work, please do not hesitate to contact me.

        Thank you.

      • Bruce Temkin says:

        Adam: Good Idea, thanks. We’ll look into doing it…

  3. Christine says:

    Can you clarify if the base amount of 5000 U.S. Customers is for each 180 companies surveyed?

  4. Dameka Thomas says:

    I need a report such as this for a college resaerch analysis report, how can I obtain one for free without having to pay these outragoeus prices?

  5. John Lionis says:

    Hi Bruce,
    you mentioned above you follow random sampling principles, how do you know that these scores are given by genuine customers of these companies and is not just the impressions of the general public that might never have shopped there?
    Thank you,
    John

    • Bruce Temkin says:

      Hi John: Good question. The consumers are asked a screening question to identify if they’ve interacted with the company during the previous 60 days. We do not verify their answers, but their is little incentive for them to lie. Thanks for your comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,633 other followers

%d bloggers like this: