Building A Culture Of Service At Cowboys Stadium

I recently spoke with Paul Turner, director of event operations at the Dallas Cowboys stadium. He was recruited to this position from the Philadelphia Eagles 2.5 years ago.

According to Turner, his department is the watchdog for the overall guest experience and the quality of the show and his job is to make sure that there is an infrastructure to consistently deliver on all of the promises that the sales team makes. Here’s how he framed his responsibilities: “We are in the experience business; we can’t guarantee a win.”

Creating a consistently good event experience is not an easy task. There are only a handful of events every year, so most of the game-day staff is made up of part-time employees — and it’s a very diverse workforce. Making the situation even more difficult, there are many organizations working at the Stadium, including other companies like the food service provider, Legends Hospitality.

Paul’s approach has been to create a “culture of service” that is built around the organization’s service mission statement:

We are service professionals at the world’s finest venue creating an exceptional experience for our guests in a safe, clean and friendly environment

The mission statement was created by doing research with the senior executives, so it is widely supported by the Cowboy’s executive team. Turner is empowered by the feeling that even Jerry Jones, the Cowboys owner, is supportive of this mission statement.

Part of the indoctrination for all new employees is to break down the service mission statement into its component parts, beginning with the first word. Employees are taught that  ““We” we are all in this together. We collectively succeed or fail.” And with “service professionals,” employees are made to recognize that the organization plans to treat them like professionals; which, in return, means that they will be held to a high standard of performance.

The staff is also trained on the service mission statement at the beginning of every season and it is reinforced in just about every communication. It’s at the top of all of their game-day materials and training collateral.

Because of the periodic nature of the events, they can’t burden employees with a lot of procedural knowledge. Employees are given a handbook and told that they’ll be doing the right thing if they use the mission statement as their guide.

What does Turner consider his biggest accomplishment? He’s seen a lot of buy-in and the organization hasn’t gotten distracted with a lot of messages; it’s stayed focus on the service mission statement. Turner explained that with a casual workforce, you need consistency.

And, yes, I did admit to Paul that I am a Patriots fan. But only at the very end of our discussion. :-)

The bottom line: There’s a lot of power in simple, consistent messages

About Bruce Temkin
I am a customer experience transformist, helping large organizations improve business results by changing how they deal with customers. As part of this focus, I examine strategy, marketing, interaction design, customer service, and leadership practices. I am also a fanatical student of business, so this blog provides an outlet for sharing insights from my ongoing educational journey. Simply put, I am passionate about spotting emerging best practices and helping companies master them. And, as many people know, I love to speak about these topics in almost any forum. My “title” is Managing Partner of the Temkin Group, a customer experience research and consulting firm that helps organizations become more customer-centric. Our goal is simple: accelerate the path to delighting customers. I am also the co-founder and chair of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to the success of CX professionals.

2 Responses to Building A Culture Of Service At Cowboys Stadium

  1. ccw says:

    The timing of this post is odd, given the truly dreadful job the Cowboys did hosting the Super Bowl, no?

    • Bruce Temkin says:

      cwhelan: Great comment. I should have added to the post that the NFL is responsible for all stadium activities during the Superbowl. So anything that happened at the stadium during the Superbowl is not necessarily reflective of the Cowboys Stadium operations or its culture of service.

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